The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII. Personnel Management

The skills needed to conduct contemporary U.S. foreign policy have long overflowed the narrow requirements of traditional political and economic relations to include the many talents necessary to support a host of overseas operations that cover the globe. These activities range from broad negotiations on such matters as Berlin and armaments regulation to helping less developed countries advance their production, health, and education. This extraordinary shift in personnel needs, which is likely to continue into the foreseeable future, has imposed severe strains on existing personnel practices and institutions which have already been considerably strengthened and are likely to require additional adjustment in the coming years.

In considering the problems of future organization to meet these requirements it is assumed that there are certain general qualities that are necessary as a foundation for more specialized skills.1 As always, basic intelligence will be at a premium. Ethical integrity will be essential to withstand the tests of personal values that will arise. Persevering motivation to serve the public cause will be necessary to surmont disheartening trials. A sense of how to get large numbers of people to work together effectively will be important in achieving maximum gain with minimum expenditure of resources. And a broad understanding of, and sensitivity to, different political, economic, and social environments, including one's own, will be essential as a basis for building enduring relations with other nations.

Today's demands for personnel in the major agencies associated with foreign affairs call not only for generalists who have a comprehensive understanding of foreign affairs and are capable of directing and coordinating programs of broad scope but also for experts who can deal with detailed complexities and meet high professional standards in relatively specialized fields. It should be understood, of course, that while the so-called generalists are needed to deal with broad areas of policy and operations, they should also have -- and usually do have -- some specialized skills.


A. BACKGROUND

Although personnel in defense and intelligence activities play important roles in foreign affairs, attention is centered here on selected problems that are likely to affect the personnel who would serve under the proposed Secretary of Foreign Affairs, including those in the aid and information agencies. At present the Department of State, including the International Cooperation Administration, and the U.S. Information Agency employ a total of over 23,000 American civilians, slightly more than half of whom are stationed overseas at any given

____________________
1
Another study in this series explores these qualities in greater detail. See "The Operational Aspects of United States Foreign Policy," Study No. 6, Nov. 11, 1959.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.