The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX G
STUDY: FORMULATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF U.S. FOREIGN POLICY The Brookings Institution, 722 Jackson Place NW., Washington, D.C. Submission date: October 19, 1959Purpose. -- This study will be concerned primarily with an analysis of the existing structure and process of the Federal Government for the formulation of foreign policy and the making of day-to-day decisions. It will examine such subjects as the role of American interest groups and public opinion in the formulation of our policy and its conduct in a democracy, the operation of the National Security Council and its effectiveness especially in the coordination of military and foreign policy, the operations of the Policy Planning Staff, and the actual as distinct from the constitutional division of responsibility between the executive and legislative branches of the Government for the formulation of foreign policy. This study will also examine the organization of the U.S. Government for dealing with Latin American affairs, and the role of multilateral organizations in the formulation and conduct of U.S. foreign policy.
OUTLINE OF STUDY
I. Summary: Scope, conclusions, recommendations.
II. Introduction.
A. Controlling assumptions.
1. The major segments of Government to be examined will be:
a. Executive Office of the White House.
b. National Security Organization.
c. Department of State, ICA, USIA.
d. Department of Defense.
e. Department of the Treasury, Commerce, and other departments and agencies.
f. The Congress.
2. The period for which conclusions and recommendations will be projected will be long range, covering several decades.
3. The approach will be that of a general appraisal of the existing system! in relation to the probable requirements of the long-term future.
B. Design of the study.
1. Examination of the prospective environment that is likely to condition policy formulation and administration.
2. Identification and discussion of the major problems, giving special attention to U.S. relations with Latin America.
3. Conclusions, with broadly stated recommendations, in a form that will focus attention on emerging requirements, possible lines of action, and problems of adjustment.
III. The prospective environment for policymaking and administration.
A. World environment. Analysis of the following major trends, presented in such a way as to bring out the problems posed regarding the processes by which the U.S. Government determines national goals, formulates policies, and conducts operations.
1. Demographic: future trends of population growth and distribution.
2. Scientific-technological: communications, transport, industry, agriculture, energy, weapons systems.
3. Politicosocial: general political and social conditions within and among states which affect their international roles.
B. Internal environment within the United States.
1. Demographic.
2. Scientific-technological.
3. Politicosocial.
C. Implications for the -- future.
1. Major challenges likely to confront the United States, including its relative position in the world.
2. Requirements for effective policy formulation and administration

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.