Conquest by Terror: The Story of Satellite Europe

By Leland Stowe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Secret Police or How the Communists Control Everybody

A "DISPLACED" BUDAPEST BANKER ORDERED coffee at his favorite café and started a friendly conversation with the waiter, an old acquaintance. The waiter glanced carefully around, then murmured, "Please, Sir. Don't talk these days with any waiter!" Three waiters in Bucharest's most popular restaurants have won rather startling promotions. One emerged as a colonel, the other two as majors in the M.I.A.--Rumania's equivalent of Russia's dreaded M.V.D. Throughout satellite Europe today every waiter is compelled to serve as an agent of the secret police. He must make nightly reports of "useful information"; otherwise he loses his job.

A Prague S.N.B. officer told a meeting of Czech customs inspectors in July, 1950, that they must show their loyalty by denouncing "at least one enemy of the state each month." By January, 1951, under the slogan of "more denunciations to help world peace," each customs official was ordered to boost his denunciations to three persons per month. Failure to conform would be considered "lack of vigilance." Customs inspectors also have to eat.

Russia's Europe is infested with police spies. Hotel employees. apartment-house managers, janitors, mailmen, railroad conductors and countless others are forced to act as informers for Soviet-type secret-police organizations. Even at the risk of sounding like a circus blurb-writer, it is sober fact to state that the Soviet Communists possess the greatest, as well as the most

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