Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle

By Christopher Shields | Go to book overview

9
The Homonymy of Being

9. 1
A FRAMEWORK FOR DISCUSSION

When he sought to explicate and defend Aristotle's conception of the homonymy of being in his seminal Von der mannigfachen Bedeutung des Seienden nach Aristoteles,1 Franz Brentano quite reasonably focused initially on two passages of the Metaphysics. In the first passage, Aristotle claims:

Being is spoken of in many ways, but with respect to one source. For some things are called beings because they are substances; others ≪are called beings≫ because they are attributes of substance, others because each is a route toward substance: either destructions or privations or qualities or productive or generative of substance; ≪still others are called beings because they are≫ things spoken of in relation to substance, or negations of one of these or of substance. For this reason we say that even non-being is a non-being. ( Met. 1003b6-10)

In the second, Aristotle advances an evidently non-equivalent, more encompassing contention:

Being, spoken of simply, is spoken of in many ways, one of which was2 the accidental, another was the true (with non-being as the false), and beyond these there are the schemes of the categories (e.g. what ≪something is≫, quality, quantity, place, time, and if ≪being≫ signifies something else in this sort of way); and further beyond all these as in potentiality and actuality. ( Met. 1026a33-b2)

Brentano thought these passages came to the same thing,3 in as much as each carries a commitment to the same doctrine (cf. also Met. 1003a33-4, 1017a8-b9, 1028a10-31, 1051a34-b6). From each he elicited a fourfold homonymy of being: (i) accidental being as opposed to being in itself (on kata sumbebêkos as opposed to on kath' hauto); (ii) being as truth (on hôs alêthes); (iii) categorial being; and (iv) being in potentiality as opposed to being in actuality (on dunamei as opposed to on energeia(i)). He

____________________
1
Brentano 1862/ 1975.
2
Aristotle here refers back to the discussion of the mulitivocity of being in Metaphysics v. 7.
3
Brentano 1862/ 1975, 3-5.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • I - Homonymy as Such 7
  • 1 - The Varieties of Homonymy 9
  • 2 - The Promises and Problems of Homonymy 43
  • 3 - Homonymy and Signification 75
  • 4 - Core-Dependent Homonymy 103
  • II - Homonymy at Work 129
  • 5 - The Body 131
  • 6 - Oneness, Sameness, and Referential Opacity 155
  • 7 - The Meaning of Life 176
  • 8 - Goodness 194
  • 9 - The Homonymy of Being 217
  • Afterword: Homonymy's Promise Reconsidered 268
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index of Passages Cited 281
  • General Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.