Town and Country under Fascism: The Transformation of Brescia, 1915-1926

By Alice A. Kelikian | Go to book overview

Conclusion

IN September 1924, when the crowd at a PNF rally chanted, ' Turati is our god, Mussolini our king', a first-hour enthusiast took offence and reported the incident to the local authorities.1 The new regime destroyed neither the church nor the monarchy. In the pantheon of provincial politics, only the idols had changed, and the denouncer seemed especially concerned about the precedence. Although the Duce crowed that he had undermined the ideals and structures of liberal Italy, the actual achievements of the dictatorship belied its leader's claims. Perhaps the 'fascist revolution' had occurred, but only within the framework of inherited values and established trends.

Nineteenth-century liberalism aimed to contain the social consequences of industrial growth by reconciling order and tradition within a progressive and unified economy. World War I, however, effaced this vision of a modern, bourgeois utopia when it divided the country into those who embraced an élitist conception of the nation- state and those orientated towards the people. The constitutional right looked to intervention for internal strength and cohesion. Instead, socialist trade unionism emerged the apparent victor. The mobilization in 1915 both stimulated the mass organization of labour and exposed the patchy pattern of development in private enterprise. While the terms of industrial conflict underwent a dramatic transformation, the military effort also strained the fragile institutions of parliamentary democracy. The state assumed a central role in regulating arms production, commercial activity, and politics on the home front. And just as the autarky of the provincial community began to fade away, bureaucracy in Rome started its retreat from civilian life. The old governing class returned to power only to confront a crisis of legitimacy.

If the Great War damaged the prospects of democratic representation in Italy, then the beginning of demobilization in 1918 and the onset of deflation in 1920 eliminated them. At Brescia the Partito Popolare was the obvious heir to the constitutional parties. Despite its ambiguities and limitations, Don Sturzo's movement could mobilize

____________________
1
ASB, GP, b. 18, n. 1264, Gargnano, 21 September 1924.

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Town and Country under Fascism: The Transformation of Brescia, 1915-1926
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Silk, Steel, and Society 7
  • 2 - Workers and Warriors 45
  • 3 - Political Alignments in Post-War Brescia 70
  • 4 - Labours of the Left 96
  • 5 - Conservative Revival in the Search for Order 117
  • 6 - Lamentations and Recriminations 137
  • 7 - The Brescian Road to Fascism 161
  • 8 - Strike and Stabilization 181
  • Conclusion 201
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.