Human Rights of Women: National and International Perspectives

By Rebecca J. Cook | Go to book overview

Appendix C: Organizational Resources
The following is an incomplete listing of organizations that work toward the development and application of international human rights law for women. Where possible, organization reports or periodicals are indicated.
A. International and Regional Governmental Organizations
Commonwealth Secretariat. Legal and Constitutional Division, Marlborough House, Pall Mall, London SW14 5HX, United Kingdom. Tel: 44-1-839- 3411; Fax: 44-1-930-0827.
Council of Europe Directorate of Human Rights, B.P. 431 R6, F 67006 Strasbourg, France.
European Community. Women's Information Office, 200 Rue de ia Loi, B-1049 Brussels, Belgium. Tel: 32- 2-299-411/416; Fax: 32-2-299-9283.
International Labour Office (ILO). Adviser on Women Workers, 4, Route des Morillons, CH 1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Tel: 41-22-799-6111; Fax: 41-22-798-8685.
Organization of American States. Inter-American Commission of Women (CIM), 1889 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20006 U.S.A. Tel: 202-458-6084; Fax: 202-458-6094.
United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Branch. Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Tel: 43-1-21131- 4269; Fax: 43-1-2192-599.
United Nations Centre for Human Rights. Palais des Nations, 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland. Tel: 41-22-734-6011; Fax: 41-22-917-0123.
United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW). DC-2 Bldg., 12th Floor, 2 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017 U.S.A. DAW has developed the Women's Information System, a computerized bibliographic data system and publishes Women 2000. Tel: 212- 963-4668; Fax: 212-963-3463.
United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). 304 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017, U.S.A. Tel: 212-906-6454; Fax: 212-906-6705.
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Adviser on Women, 7 Place de Fontenoy, Paris 75700, France. Tel: 33-1-4568- 3814; Fax: 33-1-4065-9871.

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