The Hermeneutic Tradition: From Ast to Ricoeur

By Gayle L. Ormiston; Alan D. Schrift | Go to book overview

Preface

There are certain unavoidable risks incurred in any attempt to catalogue a tradition. When this project began, we hoped to present certain canonical statements on hermeneutics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with certain current perspectives on the "practices" of interpretation theory that stand both within and apart from what might be called the "classical hermeneutical tradition." In the process of deciding which representative texts to include, we realized that the breadth and depth of such an endeavor made impractical the binding of these diverse interpretive perspectives within one volume. Faced with eliminating or abridging certain selections, or dividing the project into two books that would reflect our "original intention" to juxtapose both familiar and contemporary voices within the tradition, the choice was clear. Because of our commitment to presenting relatively complete expressions that display both recognized and unexpected continuities, we divided the material in terms of the marked differences between the authors' interpretations of interpretive practices. We believe The Hermeneutic Tradition: From Ast to Ricoeur can stand alone. But we hope the connections with its companion, Transforming the Hermeneutic Context: From Nietzsche to Nancy, will be as apparent to the reader as they have been to its editors throughout the life of the project.

There are many individuals and institutions without whose assistance the completion of this project would not have been possible. For their encouragement and valuable support, we wish to thank our families, friends, and colleagues. Special thanks are due to Eric Blondel, Fred Dallmayr, Rodolphe Gasché, David E. Linge, Jean-Luc Nancy, Richard Palmer, Paul RicoeuL John Sailis, and Calvin O. Schrag. For their time and expertise in generously contributing their translations, we thank George H. Leiner, John B. Thompson, and Dora Van Vranken. Further, we would like to acknowledge the financial, secretarial, and computer services support provided by the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Grinnell College, Denison University, Purdue University, and the University of California at Riverside. Additional major funding was supplied to Gayle L. Ormiston by the University of Colorado's Committee on Research and Creative Works and the President's Fund for the Humanities, and to Alan D. Schrift by the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship for Modern Society and

-ix-

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The Hermeneutic Tradition: From Ast to Ricoeur
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Editors'' Introduction 1
  • Notes 28
  • Part I - The Hermeneutic Legend 37
  • 1 - Hermeneutics 54
  • 2 - The Aphorisms on Hermeneutics from 1805 and 1809/10 83
  • 3 - The Hermeneutics- Outline of the 1819 Lectures 1 99
  • 4 - The Rise of Hermeneutics 114
  • 5 - Being and Time 139
  • Part II - Hermeneutics and Critical Theory- Dialogues on Methodology 145
  • 7 - Hermeneutics as the General Methodology of the Geisteswissenschaften 194
  • 8 - Truth and Method 198
  • 9 - A Review of Gadamer''s Truth and Method 241
  • 10 - The Hermeneutic Claim to Universality 270
  • 11 - Reply to My Critics 294
  • 12 - Hermeneutics and the Critique of Ideology 333
  • Selected Bibliography 335
  • Contributors 367
  • Index 369
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