Olympic Marathon: A Centennial History of the Games' Most Storied Race

By Charlie Lovett | Go to book overview

29
The Games of the XXVI Olympiad: Atlanta, 1996

In the early morning of Sunday July 28, 1996, just a day after a bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park, eighty-six women lined up to compete in the fourth Women's Olympic Marathon. They represented fifty-one countries, astounding proof that women's long-distance running was truly international. Among the runners returning from previous Olympics were the defending gold medalist Valentina Yegorova of Russia, 1992 silver medalist Yuko Arimori of Japan, 1992 bronze medalist and veteran of all three previous women's Olympic marathons Lorraine Moller of New Zealand, and Katrin Dörre-Heinig (formerly Katrin Dörre), who had captured bronze in Seoul in 1988. Despite the experience represented by these veterans, none was the prohibitive favorite in Atlanta.

That distinction belonged to Uta Pippig of Germany, who had won the past three Boston Marathons. Pippig's Olympic experience had come not in the marathon but in the 10,000 meters race, in which she finished seventh in Barcelona. Pippig was born in East Germany and as a youngster was taken into the East Germany sports system where coaches tried to sneak anabolic steroids into her morning vitamins until her physician parents recognized the pills and told Uta not to take them. In 1988 her trip to the Seoul Olympics was cancelled by officials because her boyfriend had questioned the government's travel policy. On January 3, 1990, three months after the fall of the Berlin wall, Pippig and her boyfriend defected, crossing the border with three suitcases and no money. With the fall of the

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Olympic Marathon: A Centennial History of the Games' Most Storied Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.