The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

explanatory power, or stability would arise from the exogenous variables, not from the relationship itself.

The result of three centuries spent pondering these questions is an orthodoxy that is not sure whether there is a relationship between growth and conflict or not, that focuses narrowly on current policy, and seeks the causes of growth and conflict as separate, unrelated phenomena. While their respective disciplines have much to say, and many powerful theories and explanations to offer, about either growth or conflict, neither economists nor political scientists seem prone to answer clearly the many vexing questions about both growth and conflict that arise as nations struggle with the search for both peace and prosperity:

If there is a growth-conflict relationship, what is it?
If there isn't one, why not?
If there is one, what can people do about it?
If there isn't one, what should people do about it?
Is some intervening variable really more significant than either growth, the independent variable, or conflict, the dependent variable?
If so, what is it, and how can people manage it?
How can analysts or policy-makers predict whether an action, policy, or phenomenon will bring growth, stagnation, conflict, or cooperation?


NOTES
1.
Martin Wight, International Theory. The Three Traditions, edited by Gabriele Wight & Brian Porter (Leicester & London: Leicester University Press for the Royal Institute of International Affairs, 1991).
2.
A third sort of intervening "behavioral" variables had some currency briefly after World War II. Reflecting sociological and psychological theories of individual behavior, these explanations offered little beyond noting that decisions depend on decision-makers.
3.
At least one contrary strand of an inchoate "post"-neorealism is trying to resurrect David Hume's eighteenth-century concept of "moral sciences," which referred to efforts to understand the human condition and free humanity from ignorance, superstition, and oppressive social relations. See Peter Hamilton, "The Enlightenment and the Birth of Social Science," Stuart Hall & Bram Gieben, eds., Formations of Modernity ( Oxford: Polity, 1992), 18-58. What Ken Booth has named "Global Moral Science" hopes to shift the focus of realism from "accumulating knowledge about relations between states . . . to thinking about ethics and applied ethics on a global scale . . . the study of security and the good life of the world." Ken Booth, "Human Wrongs and International Relations," International Affairs 71 January 1995), 111.
4.
Robert Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations ( Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1987), 3-4.
5.
John H. Herz, Political Realism and Political Idealism ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951); Henry A. Kissinger, A World Restored: Metternich, Castlereagh, and the Plroblems of Peace, 1812-1822 ( New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1964); Hans J.Morgenthau

-97-

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The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - Historical Perspectives 9
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - Theoretical Approaches 37
  • Notes 97
  • 4 - An Empirical Approach 107
  • Notes 164
  • 5 - A Quandary and a Conjecture 171
  • Notes 188
  • 6 - What It All Means 193
  • Notes 229
  • Appendix A: On Economic Stagnation 237
  • Notes 238
  • Appendix B: On the Three Traditions 239
  • Notes 240
  • Appendix C: On Long Waves 241
  • Notes 243
  • Appendix D: On Foreign Investment 244
  • Note 245
  • Appendix E: On Division of Labor 246
  • Notes 246
  • Appendix F: On Alternative Economies 248
  • Notes 249
  • Appendix G: On Protoindustrialization 251
  • Notes 252
  • Appendix H: On Confidence Levels 253
  • Note 254
  • Appendix I: On Growth Processes 255
  • Notes 256
  • Appendix J: On Static Models 257
  • Appendix K: On Defense of Realism 259
  • Notes 260
  • Appendix L: On Growth Strategies 261
  • Appendix M: On Dualism and Growth 262
  • Notes 265
  • Appendix N: On Lawlike Regularities 267
  • Notes 269
  • Bibliography 271
  • Author Index 289
  • Subject Index 293
  • About the Author 305
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