The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

confirm Stem's observation that "the sovereign principle is often as much cherished by those who have it . . . as by those who seek it. 3

Stern clearly appreciates that the nature of sovereignty, and even some of the premises of realism, have changed as the nature of power has shifted from exclusive reliance on political-military power resources to include a modern obsession with economic resources and market power. He does not quibble about degrees or levels--or even about definitions--but realistically recognizes that states have become interdependent, and that nonstate actors have become politically important. He does not accept, however, that either trend marks the end of sovereignty, or even transfer of sovereignty to international organizations.

[Many liberals and globalists may argue on the one hand that] the thickening web of international economic institutions, common markets, and specialized agencies further limits the ability of states to chart their own destinies. On the other hand, it can be contended that such organizations as the EU [ European Union], the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) may enhance the ability of states to exercise sovereign power by providing the instruments of collaboration by which participants may secure their individual objectives. . . . it is still governments that determine the shape of international politics. . . . whenever governments resort to economic sanctions in support of political objectives, they underline the pre-eminence of politics. 4

In expanding his conservative realism to embrace much of the change that he has observed in his long scholarly career, Stern implicitly (if also parenthetically) recognizes the salience of knowledge and skill in exercising power, and in expanding the study of international relations beyond pure politics to embrace at least economics.

What has to change, however, is the traditional emphasis on measurable military capability. . . . any realistic account of the capacity of states to outwit, outmaneuver or defeat their rivals nowadays has to be based on a range of diplomatic, economic, political, and other considerations, including the skill of leaders in being able to choose the appropriate pressure for the ends in view. . . . this has meant placing much greater emphasis than hitherto on the intricacies of the international political economy and on technological, demographic, and environmental factors. 5


NOTES
1.
Geoffrey Stern, "International Relations in a Changing World: Bucking the Trendies." The World Today 51 ( July 1995): 149.
2.
Stern, "International Relations in a Changing World", 149-150.
3.
Stern, "International Relations in a Changing World", 150.
4.
Stern, "International Relations in a Changing World"," 149-150.
5.
Stern, "International Relations in a Changing World"," 150-151.

-260-

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The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - Historical Perspectives 9
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - Theoretical Approaches 37
  • Notes 97
  • 4 - An Empirical Approach 107
  • Notes 164
  • 5 - A Quandary and a Conjecture 171
  • Notes 188
  • 6 - What It All Means 193
  • Notes 229
  • Appendix A: On Economic Stagnation 237
  • Notes 238
  • Appendix B: On the Three Traditions 239
  • Notes 240
  • Appendix C: On Long Waves 241
  • Notes 243
  • Appendix D: On Foreign Investment 244
  • Note 245
  • Appendix E: On Division of Labor 246
  • Notes 246
  • Appendix F: On Alternative Economies 248
  • Notes 249
  • Appendix G: On Protoindustrialization 251
  • Notes 252
  • Appendix H: On Confidence Levels 253
  • Note 254
  • Appendix I: On Growth Processes 255
  • Notes 256
  • Appendix J: On Static Models 257
  • Appendix K: On Defense of Realism 259
  • Notes 260
  • Appendix L: On Growth Strategies 261
  • Appendix M: On Dualism and Growth 262
  • Notes 265
  • Appendix N: On Lawlike Regularities 267
  • Notes 269
  • Bibliography 271
  • Author Index 289
  • Subject Index 293
  • About the Author 305
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