The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries

By James Lockhart | Go to book overview

10
Conclusion

WHEN I SET OUT to do the research and writing that eventuated in this book, I wanted in a very general way to help put the history of indigenous people in Spanish America on the same level as the more developed literature about Spaniards.* I did not mean to tie the work to any single theme. Perhaps I was especially interested in demonstrating the desirability or necessity, as well as the feasibility, of using Indian-language sources in writing the history of at least some major indigenous groups after European contact. I wished to show, and believe I have shown, that such groups long continued to constitute an immensely complex, partly autonomous sector that must be studied on its own terms, if only because its nature was vital to questions of postconquest continuity and change affecting early Spanish America as a whole--Indians, Spaniards, and their common arena, Spanish American society in general. Then too, the book, as the result of the first broad pass through the Nahuatl sources, contains much that may illuminate indigenous life in some way without being closely related to any particular special theme; I meant to let no detectable new characteristic of Nahua culture and its postconquest evolution escape mention.

Nevertheless, as the study progressed it became surprisingly thematic; nor could this result be said to have been entirely accidental. Ever since my first archival experiences with them, I have had great respect for the degree of integrity of both Hispanic and indigenous spheres in early Spanish America. I have felt that each long retained its own center of balance, relatively imper-

____________________
*
Around 1973-75, when I first began to attack Nahuatl studies seriously, it seemed self- evident that the historical literature was markedly imbalanced in favor of Spaniards. The time since then has seen a flood of high-quality ethnohistorical publications on Mesoamerica and the Andes, and one is tempted to say that we have redressed the imbalance or even perhaps gone overboard in the other direction, especially with research on Indians seen in isolation from other groups. Nevertheless, at the present writing, the corpus of scholarship on Spaniards remains far bulkier, more varied, and more comprehensive in coverage, and we continue to have a far subtler, fuller understanding of the workings of the Hispanic component of Spanish American society and culture.

-427-

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The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Figures xii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Altepetl 14
  • 3 - Household 59
  • 4 - Social Differentiation 94
  • 5 - Land and Living 141
  • 6 - Religious Life 203
  • 8 - Ways of Writing 326
  • 9 - Forms of Expression 374
  • 10 - Conclusion 427
  • Appendixes 453
  • Notes 475
  • Glossary 607
  • Bibliography 613
  • Index 631
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