The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries

By James Lockhart | Go to book overview

Bibliography

In all likelihood, well over half of all the older Nahuatl documents in existence are held by the Archivo General de la Nación in Mexico City ( AGN). This repository is surely the first place to look for mundane Nahuatl records of all kinds, and it has been my mainstay. Among its holdings, the section Tierras stands out as the overwhelmingly predominant source, although a significant amount of material was found in Hospital de Jesús, Bienes Nacionales, and Vinculos as well. The documents tend to be wills and yet more wills, with a good sprinkling of land sales and transfers, petitions and other correspondence, lists of people or assets, local court proceedings, and records of cabildo actions.

But if the AGN has provided the basic archival landscape, other repositories have revealed salient features necessary to define it. With a few exceptions such as the great cache of documents concerning Coyoacan in Tierras 1735, or the collection of petitions and other papers from the Marquesado in Hospital de Jesús 210, the AGN seems at some past time to have been ransacked of spectacular materials in Nahuatl (or perhaps they were held back from the beginning and never entered the central governmental archives). The greatest single holder of such documents is the Archivo Histórico of the Museo Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico City ( MNAH AH). It contains, in its Colección Antigua and the Gómez de Orozco Collection, items as important for the present study as the early Cuernavaca-region censuses, the Tlaxcalan cabildo minutes, annals of Puebla and Tlaxcala, the sixteenth-century annals of Tenochtitlan associated (probably wrongly) with the name of Juan Bautista, and the de la Cruz family papers from Tepemaxalco (CFP). In the Archivo Histórico one will also find photocopies and microfilm of many Nahuatl documents whose originals are elsewhere, some of them now inaccessible or lost.

The Biblioteca Nacional in Mexico City holds the original of the Cantares Mexicanos, which I consulted (although I mainly used facsimiles and published transcriptions). The Biblioteca's holdings include a good share of mundane documentation, which I confess to not having explored systematically, since my allotted archival time was already being devoted to investigating virtually identical material in the AGN.

Repositories in the United States have been important for my project. At the top of the list are holdings of the Special Collections section of the UCLA Research Library, among which the Tulancingo collection ( UCLA TC) was especially significant. The Nahuatl material is not very bulky (the whole collection is only a fraction of a

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The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Figures xii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Altepetl 14
  • 3 - Household 59
  • 4 - Social Differentiation 94
  • 5 - Land and Living 141
  • 6 - Religious Life 203
  • 8 - Ways of Writing 326
  • 9 - Forms of Expression 374
  • 10 - Conclusion 427
  • Appendixes 453
  • Notes 475
  • Glossary 607
  • Bibliography 613
  • Index 631
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