Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age

By Mark Selden; Laura Hein | Go to book overview

years prior to 1945, it was mainly this generation that supported them and that has pushed ever since for recognition of Japanese atrocities and compensation to victims.

Of course, there have been other important changes as well. In the 1980s, as they reached retirement age, former Japanese soldiers began to break their silence over their own wartime actions and culpability. Another decisive change is that many Asian countries have successfully democratized, profoundly influencing opportunities for their citizens to speak up about their own experiences, including demands for reparations for wartime atrocities. In 1988, the United States government apologized and ordered compensation to Japanese-Americans incarcerated during the war. In January 1989, the death of the Showa emperor eased the way for more open discussion of war responsibility in the Japanese media. Then, in January 1992, just before Prime Minister Miyazawa Kiichi was about to make a state visit to the Republic of Korea, scholars discovered documents proving that the wartime government and military had directly recruited and managed the former "military comfort women." The Japanese government issued an apology to the affected countries. Since then, the issue of unsettled compensation--not just to comfort women but to other victims, too--has become a major topic of discussion in Japan, in Asia, and throughout the world.

Thus, in the 1980s, the commemoration of World War II in Japan began to change radically in response to both domestic and international events. The fiftieth anniversary of defeat was an occasion for renewed emphasis on nationalism but also marked a shift in the nature of that nationalism and spurred challenges to it. Past commemorations emphasized the difference in outlook between the wartime and postwar generations in very static ways. In both Japan and the United States, the fiftieth anniversary of the end of the war and the dawn of the nuclear era brought to the fore ideas about patriotism that are likely to have long-term and interactive significance for both nations.


Notes
1.
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, exhibition planning document, "The Crossroads: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II," July 1993, 2.
2.
Asahi Shinbun, November 29, 1994.
3.
Air Force Association, "Special Report: The Smithsonian and the Enola Gay," March 15, 1994, 3-4, 13.
4.
Ikoi Hidetaka, Janguru-kuruuzu ni uttetsuke no hi (Perfect day for a jungle cruise) ( Tokyo: Chikuma Shobo, 1987).
5.
"U.S. Senate Resolution 257--Relating to the Enola Gay Exhibit," unofficial

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.