Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age

By Mark Selden; Laura Hein | Go to book overview

About the Authors

Laura Hein teaches Japanese history at Northwestern University, specializing in postwar economic and political history. She is the author of Fueling Growth: Energy and Economic Policy in Postwar Japan ( 1990); "Growth versus Success" in Andrew Gordon, ed., Postwar Japan as History ( 1993); "In Search of Peace and Democracy," Journal of Asian Studies ( 1994); "Japan and the West Revisited," in Diplomatic History (1996); and editor of a special issue of the Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, "Remembering the Bomb: the Fiftieth Anniversary in the United States and Japan" ( 1995).

Mark Selden is the author of China in Revolution: The Yenan Way Revisited ( 1995) and The Political Economy of Chinese Development ( 1993), co-author of Chinese Village, Socialist State (1991), winner of the Joseph Levenson Prize of the Association for Asian Studies, and co-editor of The Atomic Bomb: Voices from Hiroshima and Nagasaki ( 1989). He teaches sociology and history at Binghamton University and edits the M.E. Sharpe series Japan in the Modern World.

Sadao ASADA is Professor of International History, Political Science Department, Doshisha University. He is the editor of Japan and the World, 1853-1952: A Bibliographic Guide ( 1989). His book Ryotaisenkan no Nichibei kankei (Japanese-American relations between the wars: naval policy and the decision-making process), which received the Yoshino Sakuzo Prize, will appear in English translation.

Monica Braw is a historian, foreign correspondent and novelist. She began covering Asia in 1969 and received her Ph.D. in history from the University of Lund in 1986. She is the author of thirteen books, including several on Japan, as well as novels and short story collections. Besides her native Swedish, her work has been published in Finnish, German, English, French, and Japanese.

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