A Survey of Indian Assimilation in Eastern Sonora

By Thomas B. Hinton | Go to book overview

1 CONTEMPORARY SOCIO-RACIAL CLASSIFICATIONS

IN EASTERN Sonora there are several socio- racial designations in common use today. A definition of these is necessary if we are to examine the place of the Indians in that area at the present time. Although terms vary to some extent from district to district and from person to person, their use is roughly consistent over the whole region. In the case of the Opatas and Jovas, where present cultural differences from the non-Indian population are slight to non-existent, these classifications appear to be based largely on known or assumed physical ancestry with some consideration as to socio-economic position and village of origin. The Indian category, nevertheless, coincides to a high degree with those families still retaining features of "Indian" culture. In much of the Pima area, the designations have a language basis as well. In most cases, as there is no definite line of division between the groups, the categories overlap. It should be mentioned that often "Indianness" is a matter of generation. The grandparents may be classed as Indians while the continually more mixed and Mexicanized second and third generations become gente de razon (people of reason, i.e. non-Indian). These terms carry some social rank connotations in that the Whites are characteristically at the top, both economically and socially, while the Indians most often are in evidence at the lower levels. Mestizos are found at all levels, but appear to be most numerous between the two extremes.

Blanco or white is used in two senses. In its primary use the word is applied to people of complete or nearly complete European physical appearance. In the area under discussion this physical type is confined largely to the upper class of the larger towns, being more in evidence in the northern part of the territory and in the vicinity of the old Spanish mining camps. In a wider sense the term blanco is used when referring to all those not tagged inditos or indios, being used interchangeably with gente de razon. In this paper blanco will be used in the primary sense.

Mestizo, also called el tipo mexicano, refers to the mixed European-Indian population where physical features are not pronouncedly Indian. These people are also often labeled blanco with the majority calling themselves mestizos only when discussing their ancestry.

The indiada, the Indians, is subdivided into

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Survey of Indian Assimilation in Eastern Sonora
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction 6
  • Contents 7
  • 1: Contemporary Socio-Racial Classifications 9
  • 2 - THE OPATAS AND JOVAS 12
  • 3 - MODERN DISTRIBUTION OF OPATAS AND JOVAS 19
  • 4 - THE LOWER PIMAS 26
  • CONCLUSIONS 30
  • References 31
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 32

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.