The Irish in Philadelphia: Ten Generations of Urban Experience

By Dennis Clark | Go to book overview

in which ordinary working-class families were able to own a two-story brick row house. Low-cost, decent housing had many fascinating ramifications. For one thing, it meant the death rate in Philadelphia for the early Irish was dramatically lower than for the same group elsewhere: 12.2 per thousand, compared with 21.2 for New York and 37.7 for Boston. The city avoided the congestion and squalor of New York's tenements. "The owner-occupied row house fortified Philadelphians in a pattern of localism that gave the city's neighborhood life a settled quality and stability. Home ownership made neighborhoods less subject to turnover."

The industrial boom which Pennsylvania enjoyed in the middle and last decades of the nineteenth century enabled Philadelphia to absorb tens of thousands of impoverished Irish immigrants with very little overt friction. There were, of course, serious economic hardships for the immigrants, but the Irish rapidly penetrated the business community as building contractors, real estate brokers, saloonkeepers, and grocers. Many others entered the "aristocracy of labor" as skilled craftsmen. For the first generation of Irish, the contrast was vivid between this upward mobility and the stagnation and low economic horizons of rural Ireland. The record of the Irish in nineteenth-century Philadelphia suggests strongly that when an urban community has to accommodate large numbers of working-class newcomers, nothing helps social adjustment more than full employment and an expanding economy.

Philadelphia is unique among the older big cities in not developing a political machine controlled by the Irish. It had a machine, all right, and the Irish played prominent roles in running it, but they were never in exclusive control for long periods as they were in Boston, New York, and Chicago. The city did not have its first Irish Catholic mayor until 1962. Analyzing this deviation from the big-city norm, Clark shows how the Irish fractured their own potential strength. Many of them had the characteristic Irish affinity for the Democratic

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Irish in Philadelphia: Ten Generations of Urban Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • One a Tradition Grows 3
  • Two the Famine Generation 24
  • Three City Shelter 38
  • Four Working to Live 61
  • Five Church and School 88
  • Six Clans and Causes 106
  • Seven Hibernia Philadelphia 126
  • Eight the Tradition Persists 145
  • Nine the Urban Irishman 165
  • Notes 185
  • NOTE ON SOURCES 237
  • Index 243
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.