Documents Relating to the Controversy over Neutral Rights between the United States and France, 1797-1800

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DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE CONTROVERSY OVER NEUTRAL RIGHTS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE, 1797-1800.

Extract from Notes to Treaties and Conventions, 1889, relating to the United States and France1

On the 25th of January, 1782, the Continental Congress passed an act authorizing and directing Dr. Franklin to conclude a Consular Convention with France on the basis of a scheme which was submitted to that body. Dr. Franklin concluded a very different convention, which Jay, the Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and Congress did not approve.2 Franklin having returned to America, the negotiations then fell upon Jefferson, who concluded the Convention of 1788. This was laid before the Senate by President Washington on the 11th of June, 1789.

On the 21st of July it was ordered that the Secretary of Foreign Affairs attend the Senate to-morrow and bring with him such papers as are requisite to give full information relative to the Consular Convention between France and the United States.3 Jay was the Secretary thus "ordered." He was holding over, as the new Department was not then created. The Bill to establish a Department of Foreign Affairs had received the assent of both Houses the previous day,4 but had not yet been approved by the President.5 Jay appeared, as directed, and made the necessary explanations.6 The Senate then Resolved that the Secretary of Foreign Affairs under the former Congress be requested to peruse the said Convention, and to give his opinion bow far be conceives the faith of the United States to be engaged, either by former

____________________
NOTE.--The footnotes in this section are reproduced exactly as they appear in the original document excepting necessary changes in exponents.
1
Treaties and Conventions, 1889.
2
1 D. C., 1783-89, 232.
3
Annals 1st Sess. 1st Cong., 52.
4
Ib., 685.
5
Ib., 52.
6
Ib.,

-1-

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Documents Relating to the Controversy over Neutral Rights between the United States and France, 1797-1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Authorities vii
  • Extract from Notes to Treaties and Conventions, 1889, Relating to the United States and France 1
  • Extracts from Messages of President Adams, and Replies of the Senate and House 27
  • Acts of Congress 59
  • Proclamations 77
  • Appendix 81
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