Documents Relating to the Controversy over Neutral Rights between the United States and France, 1797-1800

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APPENDIX

CONVENTION OF PEACE, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE1

Concluded September 30, 1800; ratifications exchanged at Paris, July 31, 1801; proclaimed December 21, 1801

The Premier Consul of the French Republic in the name of the people of France, and the President of the United States of America, equally desirous to terminate the differences which have arisen between the two States, have respectfully appointed their Plenipotentiaries, and given them full power to treat upon those differences, and to terminate the same; that is to say, the Premier Consul of the French Republic, in the name of the people of France, has appointed for the Plenipotentiaries of the said Republic the citizens Joseph Bonaparte, ex-Ambassador at Rome and Counsellor of State; Charles Pierre Claret Fleurieu, Member of the National Institute and of the Board of Longitude of France and Counsellor of State, President of the Section of Marine; and Pierre Louis Rœderer, Member of the National Institute of France and Counsellor of State, President of the Section of the Interior; and the President of the United States of America. by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the said States, has appointed for their Plenipotentiaries, Oliver Ellsworth, Chief Justice of the United States; William Richardson Davie, late Governor of the State of North Carolina; and William Vans Murray, Minister Resident of the United States at The Hague; who, after having exchanged their full powers, and after full and mature discussion of the interests, have agreed on the following articles:


ARTICLE I

There shall be a firm, inviolable, and universal peace, and a true and sincere friendship between the French Republic and the United States of America, and between their respective countries, territories, cities, towns, and people, without exception of persons or places.


ARTICLE II

The Ministers Plenipotentiary of the two parties not being able to agree at present respecting the treaty of alliance of 6th February. 1778, the treaty of amity and commerce of the same date, and the

____________________
1
Malloy, Treaties, etc., vol. 1, p. 496.

-81-

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Documents Relating to the Controversy over Neutral Rights between the United States and France, 1797-1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Authorities vii
  • Extract from Notes to Treaties and Conventions, 1889, Relating to the United States and France 1
  • Extracts from Messages of President Adams, and Replies of the Senate and House 27
  • Acts of Congress 59
  • Proclamations 77
  • Appendix 81
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