Life-Span Developmental Psychology: Methodological Contributions

By Stanley H. Cohen; Hayne W. Reese | Go to book overview

do emerge from that analysis should be interpreted. Hertzog and Yuasa ( 1988) discussed this and other the substantive issues regarding the mental rotation task in detail. The important point, analytically, is that we have learned much more from formulating and testing specific substantive hypotheses with corresponding statistical tests. The selection of analysis strategy ought not be driven by cookbook or by some presumably optimal set of decision rules (even of the type implied by Figs. 9.1 and 9.2). Instead it ought to be driven by a concern to make appropriate use of statistical inference (including control of the Type I error rate while minimizing the Type II error rate) in directly testing substantive hypotheses of interest.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I'm grateful to the National Institute on Aging for a Research Career Development Award (K04 AG00335), which gave me time to work on this chapter. This manuscript would not have been produced without the skillful help of Debra Jennings and Patti Morgan, who revised text and corrected Greek symbols in too many drafts to count.


REFERENCES

Appelbaum M. I., & McCall R. B. ( 1983). "Design and analysis in developmental psychology". In P. H. Mussen (ed.), Handbook of child psychology ( 4th ed., Vol. 1, pp. 415-476). New York: Wiley.

Baltes P. B. ( 1968). "Longitudinal and cross-sectional sequences in the study of age and generation effects". Human Development, 11, 145-171.

Baltes P. B., Reese H. W., & Nesselroade J. R., ( 1977). "Life-span developmental psychology". Introduction to research methods. Monterey., CA: Brooks/Cole.

Berg C., Hertzog C., & Hunt E. ( 1982). "Age differences in the speed of mental rotation". Developmental Psychology, 18, 95-107.

Bird K. D., & Hadzi-Pavlovic D. ( 1983). "Simultaneous test procedures and the choice of a test statistic in MANOVA". Psychological Bulletin, 93, 167-178.

Blalock H. M. ( 1982). Conceptualization and measurement in the social sciences. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Bock R. D. ( 1975). Multivariate statistical models in behavioral research. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Bock R. D. ( 1979). "Univariate and multivariate analysis of variance with time-structured data". In J. R. Nesselroade & P. B. Baltes (Ed.), Longitudinal research in the study of behavior and development. New York: Academic Press.

Boik R. J. ( 1979). "Interactions, partial interactions, and interaction contrasts in the analysis of variance". Psychological Bulletin, 86, 1084-1089.

Boik R. J. ( 1981). "A priori tests in repeated measures designs: Effects of nonsphericity". Psychometrika, 46, 241-255.

Box G. E. P. ( 1954). "Some theorems on quadratic forms applied in the study of analysis of variance problems: II. Effects of inequality of variance and of correlation between errors in the two-way classification". Annals of Mathematical Statistics, 25, 484-98.

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life-Span Developmental Psychology: Methodological Contributions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.