The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

By Horatio T. Strother | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
WEST CONNECTICUT TRUNK LINES

WHILE some fugitives entered Connecticut from the sea, at New Haven or another port, the majority came by overland routes. Pennsylvania, whose southern border was the Mason-Dixon line, received thousands of runaways from the contiguous states of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware; and Philadelphia, with its large Quaker population and its long-established Underground apparatus, became a most important haven and forwarding station for refugees from slavery. Between 1830 and 1860, more than 9000 slaves are said to have been helped on their way to freedom in that city.1 A great proportion of these were sent on, by rail or steamer or road, to New York City, where the Vigilance Committee, in existence by 1835 and operated mainly by Negroes, gave them protection and help. The Reverend Amos Beman, who addressed this group at one of its anniversary meetings, summarized its role in the work of the Underground Railroad:2

Those who come with fear and trembling and apply for aid, are flying from the cruel prison house--the dark land of their unpaid toil--the ground stained with their blood and wet with their bitter tears--they have journeyed with scant food, guided by the pale light of the

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The Underground Railroad in Connecticut
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - Blazing the Trail 10
  • Chapter 2 - Thorny is the Pathway 25
  • Chapter 3 - Fugitives in Flight 43
  • Chapter 4 - The Captives of the Amistad 65
  • Chapter 5 - A House Divided 82
  • Chapter 6 - This Pretended Law We Cannot Obey 93
  • Chapter 7 - New Haven, Gateway from the Sea 107
  • Chapter 8 - West Connecticut Trunk Lines 119
  • Chapter 9 - East Connecticut Locals 128
  • Chapter 10 - Valley Line to Hartford 137
  • Chapter 11 - Middletown, a Way Station 150
  • Chapter 12 - Farmington, the Grand Central Station 163
  • Chapter 13 - The Road in Full Swing 175
  • Appendices 189
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 251
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