Introduction to the Economic History of China

By E. Stuart Kirby | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Studies leading to the preparation of this volume were made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation for the years 1950 and 1951, covering the expenses directly involved, including travel to Japan in that period. The grant was administered by the University of Hongkong, in which I hold the Chair of Economics and Political Science.

My cordial thanks are due for the understanding and assistance extended by Japanese scholars in the fields concerned, at the many universities and institutions I visited at Tokyo, Kyoto and elsewhere. Their names, and their individual actions in support of my work, are really too numerous for detailed mention. I would wish, however, to refer particularly to the Oriental Research Institute at Tokyo, and the Institute for the Humanities at the (Imperial) University of Kyoto, with their Directors and staffs; together with those at the Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, who have so liberally concurred in my direct and extensive use of their material published in Japanese.

I am similarly indebted to a number of Chinese scholars-- whose names, for quite another reason, I cannot cite at present --who have assisted me by correspondence and by furnishing material, sometimes in defiance of a political regime which classes a study of this sort as 'cultural aggression'.

Personal assistance in research and bibliography has been rendered by Mr. Y. C. Wang, now at Stanford University, and Mr. Alfred Khu of Hongkong, to whom I am especially grateful.

The substance of the present work, in condensed form, appeared as a series of articles in the Far Eastern Economic Review, Hongkong, between May 1952 and February 1953. I am grateful to the proprietors of that journal for their free permission to make use of material originally appearing in its pages, which is here presented in an extended and revised form.

None of the above-mentioned persons or institutions is, however, in any way responsible for the views and conclusions in the following pages, which are entirely my own.

HONGKONG, 1953 E. S. K.

-7-

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