Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

By Hans Schear; R. F. C. Hull | Go to book overview

TRANSLATOR'S NOTE

Readers familiar with German will probably be aware that one of the main problems connected with the translation of psychological literature is the little word Seele, meaning "soul." It also of course means "psyche," and herein lies the essence of the problem. When are we to translate it as "soul," and when as "psyche"? In speaking of the problem, Jung himself has said that he would wish Seele to be translated as "soul" when the context carries with it any moral, metaphysical, or theological implications, leaving "psyche" as a purely psychological term. In practice, however, this often proves to be a distinction without a difference; for the question instantly arises: Who is to say whether the context carries with it a specifically psychological or some other kind of implication? But in the present instance the Jungian approach to this ambiguous quantity, the Seele, undoubtedly has very wide religious implications for the author, otherwise he would not have written this book. I have therefore translated Seele as "soul" throughout (although the author himself occasionally uses the word "psyche"), strange as this may sometimes sound to the reader whose attitude to these questions is primarily that of the psychologist.

A further word is necessary as regards footnotes. In the present translation, while the titles of Jung's works referred to in the text are in English, all references in the footnotes are to the German or Swiss editions. The reason for this procedure, which must strike the reader as

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Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Translator's Note 1
  • List of Abbreviations Used in Footnotes 3
  • Introduction 5
  • Elements of Jungian Psychology 21
  • The Psychic Bases of Religion 59
  • Religion as a Psychic Function 97
  • Man and Religion 137
  • Jung's Significance in the Religious Situation of Today 197
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