Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

By Hans Schear; R. F. C. Hull | Go to book overview

THE PSYCHIC BASES OF RELIGION

TURNING now to our theme, the psychology of religion as found in Jung, we shall deal first of all with the why and wherefore of religious experiences. We shall try to answer the question regarding the psychic sphere in which religious experience occurs and the psychic mechanisms whose function it involves.

For a long time it was almost a dogma with many people, theologians and others, that the sublime nature of religious experience exalted it above all other psychic processes. They denied altogether that religious experience was accessible to psychology. This standpoint has still not been abandoned by many theologians even today. They categorically refuse to acknowledge that the psyche has anything to do with religion, revelation, and faith. These things, they say, are miles away from man's psychic life and lie on a totally different plane. Such a standpoint is, in a sense, consistent and extremely simple. It can also be associated very easily with the view that man is tainted with original sin and an utterly wretched creature in consequence, whom the metaphysician can accuse of all sorts of defects and who can be so moulded by the pastor of souls that he will eventually believe the message of salvation announced to him-in other words, acknowledge it as right if only he sacrifices his reason. Unfortunately, the last three hundred years have shown more and more that this doctrine, even theologically, is not without its difficulties. It and its consequences

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Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Translator's Note 1
  • List of Abbreviations Used in Footnotes 3
  • Introduction 5
  • Elements of Jungian Psychology 21
  • The Psychic Bases of Religion 59
  • Religion as a Psychic Function 97
  • Man and Religion 137
  • Jung's Significance in the Religious Situation of Today 197
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