CHAPTER 1
NATIONS REMADE

'Small-scale' and 'Large-scale' societies -- Change in social structure -- The crucial techniques -- Sources of Western influence -- Characteristics of small-scale society -- Characterisitic effects of Western influence.

THIS BOOK is an attempt to analyse a type of change in the structure of society that is taking place at the present time over a great part of the world. In those countries that are sometimes called 'under-developed' and sometimes, more hopefully, 'developing', determined attempts are being made to raise living standards by adopting productive techniques that were invented in the Western world. The leaders of these countries have set themselves to accelerate a process that was set in motion when the command of machine technology enabled its original possessors to extend their economic and political relationships all through the world, and to organise large-scale production in countries that did not themselves have the means to do this.

People who are not familiar with the work of social anthropologists may be surprised to find that this is a matter we are concerned with. We still have the reputation -- which, of course, we made for ourselves in the past -- of being concerned with 'primitive' peoples, and directing our interest to just those features of life in the developing nations that they themselves are anxious to get rid of. But this reputation refers to a period in the history of our studies which is now long distant. In the nineteenth century anthropology was expected to throw light on the primeval condition of man, and to explain how he moved from it to the condition of Western Europe and America at

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New Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Chapter 1 - NATIONS REMADE 11
  • Chapter 2 - NEW MODES OF LIVELIHOOD 32
  • Chapter 3 - NEW FAMILIES 58
  • Chapter 4 - NEW STATES 96
  • Chapter 5 - NEW TOWNSMEN 128
  • Chapter 6 - NEW RELIGIONS 160
  • Chapter 7 - SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE 192
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 229
  • Index 231
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