History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 6

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXIV

BETWEEN the days of the two votes on the articles of Impeachment the National Union Republican convention assembled in Chicago [ May 20 ] and with great enthusiasm nominated General Grant for President by a unanimous vote. Grant's position during the ante-convention canvass had been an enviable one. Either party was willing to take him as its standard bearer. So far as he had ever had any political leanings they were Democratic. His only presidential vote had been cast for Buchanan and, had he acquired a residence in Illinois in 1860, he would have voted for Douglas.1 In 1867 the radical Republicans, fearing that Grant was not sound on Reconstruction and the negro, had desired the nomination of Chase; and there were also advocates of Colfax, who, as a great friend of his wrote, "has got the White House on the brain."2 Referring to Grant, Wade said, "A man may be all right on horses and all wrong on politics."3 But the shrewd Republican leaders and the bulk of the party wanted Grant and showed great eagerness to get him on their side. He had however told General Sherman that he would not accept a nomination for the presidency.4 On August 9, John Sherman wrote; "If he has really made up his mind that he would like to hold that office he can have it. Popular opinion is all in his favor. . . . I see

____________________
1
Personal Memoirs, vol. i. p. 215.
2
Life of Bowles, Merriam, vol. ii. p. 55.
3
E. L. Godkin's letter of Dec. 19, 1867, to the London Daily News.
4
Letter of Aug. 3, 1867. Sherman Letters, p. 292.

-269-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents of the Sixth Volume ix
  • Chapter XXX 1
  • Chapter XXXI 112
  • Chapter XXXII 171
  • Chapter XXXIII 209
  • Chapter XXXIV 269
  • Chapter XXXV 316
  • Chapter XXXVI 347
  • Chapter XXXVII 395
  • Chapter XXXVIII 446
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