History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 6

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXVIII

FOREIGN AFFAIRS now claim our attention.

At the end of 1865, while Adams was still minister to England, the British government, in response to his insistence upon reparation. for damages caused by the Alabama and other Confederate cruisers which had been built in England, declined to undertake a further consideration of our claims.1 Reverdy Johnson,2 who succeeded him and arrived in England during August 1868, found the attitude of the government entirely changed. English statesmen 'were beginning to see that the precedent set by their country of the duties of a neutral during war might be turned most disastrously against England should she become involved in hostilities: her large merchant marine would be at the mercy of armed cruisers that her enemy could easily construct in the United States. Prussia and Austria had had their duel but Europe was still in a ferment and, as England might conceivably be drawn into a conflict at any moment, it was the duty of her ministers to settle as speedily as possible the disputed questions with the American government. Reverdy Johnson was received with open arms and invited to many dinners and. banquets at which he 'spoke in effusive terms of the friendly senti-

____________________
1
Pierre's Sumner, vol. iv. p. 392, note 1; Russell to Adams, Nov. 2, 1865, Clarendon to Adams, Dec. 2, Dip. Corr. 1865, vol. i. p. 634, ibid., 1866, vol. i. p. 28. Lord Stanley of the Derby ministry modified this position to an offer of "limited reference to arbitration in regard to the socalled ' Alabama' claims." Nov. 30, 1866, March 9, Nov. 16, 1867, ibid., 1867, vol, i. pp. 188, 192, 211.
2
Appointed by A. Johnson.

-446-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents of the Sixth Volume ix
  • Chapter XXX 1
  • Chapter XXXI 112
  • Chapter XXXII 171
  • Chapter XXXIII 209
  • Chapter XXXIV 269
  • Chapter XXXV 316
  • Chapter XXXVI 347
  • Chapter XXXVII 395
  • Chapter XXXVIII 446
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