The Psalms in Israel's Worship - Vol. 1

By Sigmund Mowinckel; D. R. Ap-Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
National Psalms of Lamentation in the I-Form

Among the national and congregational psalms of lamentation mentioned in the preceding chapter (p. 194) there are several in which 'I' and 'we' alternate (see 44.5, 16; 74.12; 83.14; 123.1; 60.11). In two of them, Pss.89 and 144, the lament is put into the mouth of one -- in Ps.89 occasionally referring to himself in the third person singular -- who is no doubt the king of the people; 'the Anointed' is what he calls himself in 89.39; and in 144.10 he identifies himself with ' David', thus actually indicating that he is a descendant of David, cf. the 'seed of David' used of the worshipper himself in 18.51. There can be no doubt whatsoever that the distress complained of in Ps.89 is of a national and political nature: enemies have demolished all the walls of David's descendant and laid his fortresses in ruins and cast his crown into the dust and overthrown his throne. In Ps.144, too, the king is surrounded by foreign invaders and liars and threatened by 'the sword of evil'.

So, evidently, the national lament may have an individual and personal form. As we have seen, the king acts as the representative and the incorporation of the people: the cause of the people is his cause, and vice versa (see Chap. III).

It would hardly be correct to say that here the national psalm of lamentation has been influenced by the form of the individual lament. The fact is rather that here we still find the earliest form, in this case having two roots: first the collective way of thinking of the ancients, which would look upon the plurality as a totality, a person; and then the official royal style, which would be more interested in the king himself than in what he represented. This has been discussed in detail in Chap. III.3.

The question then presents itself whether other apparent I-laments also may not in fact be royal laments, speaking of national and political disasters and dangers. The answer to that question is in the affirmative. It must be emphasized in this connexion that we are not dealing with possible royal psalms in which the distress is private and personal, for instance illness; such poems belong rather to the true individual psalms of lamentation.


2

Psalm so is certainly a national psalm of intercession for the king before he goes to war (see Chap. VI.7.), with a very pronounced 'assurance of

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psalms in Israel's Worship - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.