The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War

By Iver Bernstein | Go to book overview

Peña and Kenneth Cobb at the New York Municipal Archives and Records Center, Susan Davis of the Manuscripts Division of the New York Public Library, Jane Reed, at the library of the Union League Club of New York, and Thomas Dunnings of the New-York Historical Society. Miriam Frank of the Tamiment Library provided expert assistance with some questions of translation and interpretation in German-language manuscript sources. Without the aid of Christine Smith and her staff in the Interlibrary Loan Office of Olin Library, Washington University, this project surely would never have been completed.

Trudi and Isaac Behar and Joan and Walter Kornbluh made a research trip to Los Angeles far more pleasurable with their special hospitality. Amy Stanley and Craig Becker offered me the comforts of their Washington, D.C. home one hot week several springs ago. My mother-in-law Shirley Sherman's cheerful willingness to serve as a New York host allowed hundreds more hours in city archives during the final stages of the project.

Sheldon Meyer of Oxford University Press saw the possibilities early on and helped to shape a dissertation into a book. Stephanie Sakson-Ford prepared the manuscript with precision and a keen ear for the right word. Scott Lenz maintained uncompromisingly high standards through to the end of the editorial process.

David Montgomery encouraged my inclination to wrestle with the most dangerous implications of a history of the draft riots and to conceive of the study in its broadest dimensions. His commitment to the project and patience with its author have been extraordinary. My debt to him can barely be put into words, nor can it easily be repaid. David Brion Davis helped to nurture an early graduate seminar paper into a dissertation. He inspired me to discover the relations between ideas and material life that form the architecture of this book. Howard R. Lamar has tried to teach me how to think about the past with the example of his own refined historical imagination. His erudition, counsel, and unfailing good humor were instrumental in bringing this book to completion; more than once he provided the key insight that allowed me to move past a conceptual barrier. Emilia Viotti da Costa was of enormous help and gave searching and exhaustive criticisms to drafts of early chapters. John L. Thomas cultivated in me a deep respect for the craft of historical writing. As a scholar and a teacher he has served as a model.

This project would have scarcely been conceivable without the pioneering work of many historians of New York City who shared their ideas and passion for the material. Joshua Brown, Peter Buckley, Graham Hodges, Bruce C. Levine, David Scobey, James P. Shenton, Michael Wallace, and Sean Wilentz have all provided intellectual and moral support. Certain friends have also taken the trouble to read and comment on versions or chapters: I thank Jeanie Attie, Kathleen Neils Conzen, Ileen DeVault, John D. French, Lori Ginzberg, James R. Grossman, Steven Hahn, Jane

-viii-

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The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - Draft Riots and the Social Order 15
  • Chapter 1 - A Multiplicity of Grievances 17
  • Chapter 2 - The Two Tempers of Draco 43
  • Part II - Origins of the Crisis, 1850s and 1860s 73
  • Chapter 3 - Workers and Consolidation 75
  • Chapter 4 - Merchants Divided 125
  • Chapter 5 - Industrialists 162
  • Part III - Resolutions of the Crisis, 1860s and 1870s 193
  • Chapter 6 - The Rise and Decline of Tweed's Tammany Hall 195
  • Chapter 7 - 1872 237
  • Epilogue: The Draft Riots' Lost Significance 259
  • Appendix A - Uptown Social Geography, 1863 265
  • Notes 287
  • Bibliographical Essay 341
  • Index 349
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