The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War

By Iver Bernstein | Go to book overview

Index
Abbott, Jacob, 105, 109-110
Act for Enrolling and Calling Out the National Forces. SeeConscription Act
Act for the Prevention of Intemperance, Paupers and Crime, 139
Acton, Thomas, 39, 45, 61, 305n. 65
Address of the Liquor Dealers and Brewers of the Metropolitan Police District, 215
Agnew, Cornelius R., 56, 158
Albany, 45, 127, 135, 187, 230
Albany Regency, 50, 62, 221
Alger, Horatio, 177
Allaire, James P., 164, 167-168, 326 n. 2; factory, 18, 109, 205, 291n. 9
Allen, Horatio, 57-58, 164, 165, 166, 168, 177, 186
Allerton brothers, 177
Allerton's Bull's Head Hotel, 21, 291 n. 9
Allison, Samuel Perkins, 152
Amalgamated Carpenters' Union, 248
Amalgamated Trades Convention, 77, 92-94, 98, 110
American Bible Society, 156
American Conflict, The (Greeley), 239
American Free Trade League, 221, 335 n. 48
American Freedmen's Commission, 47
American Home Missionary Society, 134
American Industrial Association, 141- 142
American Medical Association, 76
American Party, 140
American Society of Civil Engineers, 76
American Telegraph Company office, 21
American Tract Society, 156
American Union of Associationists, 75- 76
Americus Club, 199
Amerikanische Arbeiterbund. See Arbeiterbund
Anderson, William C., 212
Andrews, John U., 18, 56
Anti-abolitionist riot ( July, 1834), 5, 24, 149
Arbeiter Clubber 17 Ward, 225
Arbeiter Union, 224, 226, 227, 233
Arbeiter Union, Die, 226
Arbeiter Zeitung, 187-188, 223
Arbeiterbund, 92, 95-98, 186
Arbuthnot, William, 98
Arnold, Matthew, 153
Artisans, 237-238, 293-294n. 49; and draft riots, 24, 25, 41, 78, 91-92, 102-104; and eight-hour-day movement, 89-90, 104, 238, 243, 250-252; and industrialization, 78-86; political styles of, 85-104, 123-124, 241-246; and Republican Party, 86, 96, 97, 99- 100, 101, 187-188; strikes, 75, 80-81, 91, 100; and Tammany Hall, 187-188, 233-234, 236
Aspinwall, William H., 130, 302n. 2
Assembly Committees of 1850, 91
Astor, John Jacob, 208
Astor, William B., 139, 146
Astor Place riot ( 1849), 5, 148-151, 153, 189; and militia forces, 45, 54
Ayres, Mr., 172
Babcock, Orville, 218
Bailey, K. Arthur, 89-90
Baltimore, attack on Union Army, 27
Bancroft, George, 55-56
Banks, Theodore, 252
Barlow, Samuel L. M., 51, 56, 62, 129, 146-147, 148, 158, 217; and draft riots, 51, 260; and McClellan, 51, 260; and martial law, 44
Barnard, George G., 47, 51, 52, 56, 148
Barnett, T. J., 12, 62
Barney, Hiram, 115, 116
Barr, William V., 90, 91, 99, 242
Barthes, Roland, 125
Bassett, James, 89, 90, 91, 104, 242, 244
Beach, Moses Y., 207
Beekman, James, 55

-349-

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The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - Draft Riots and the Social Order 15
  • Chapter 1 - A Multiplicity of Grievances 17
  • Chapter 2 - The Two Tempers of Draco 43
  • Part II - Origins of the Crisis, 1850s and 1860s 73
  • Chapter 3 - Workers and Consolidation 75
  • Chapter 4 - Merchants Divided 125
  • Chapter 5 - Industrialists 162
  • Part III - Resolutions of the Crisis, 1860s and 1870s 193
  • Chapter 6 - The Rise and Decline of Tweed's Tammany Hall 195
  • Chapter 7 - 1872 237
  • Epilogue: The Draft Riots' Lost Significance 259
  • Appendix A - Uptown Social Geography, 1863 265
  • Notes 287
  • Bibliographical Essay 341
  • Index 349
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