Homophobia: Description, Development, and Dynamics of Gay Bashing

By Martin Kantor | Go to book overview

9
Mood (Affective) Disorder Homophobes

DEPRESSIVE HOMOPHOBES

Depressive homophobes bash gays and lesbians in order to relieve their personal feelings of worthlessness, which may appear when (1) depressive homophobes put themselves and their achievements down unnecessarily, as when a straight blue-collar construction worker feels inherently inferior because he is not a white-collar semiprofessional; or a white-collar semiprofessional feels inherently inferior because she is not a "real" professional. Or they may appear when (2) depressive homophobes put themselves down rationally, having recognized the truth: that they are troubled people who have in fact achieved little in life.

A large group of these depressive homophobes feels personally worthless in comparison to gays and lesbians because they envy them, and they envy them because they think they have it all. They handle the belief that gays and lesbians have it all by putting them down to even the score. They bash them for the same reason some fans bash their sports heroes when they lose. Manifestly they are booing them for being losers. But secretly they are just using the loss as an opportunity to express a simmering angry jealousy at the players for playing while they, the fans, remain on the sidelines.

One straight man stared bullets at gay men who were in groups obviously enjoying each other's company. He envied their being together because their being together called his own loneliness to mind. When he railed against "faggots" he was in fact condemning them for having the fun he felt he could never have. The same man called all gays and lesbians elitists, condemning them in a way that sounded suspiciously like a compliment.

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Homophobia: Description, Development, and Dynamics of Gay Bashing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.