Homophobia: Description, Development, and Dynamics of Gay Bashing

By Martin Kantor | Go to book overview

18
How Gays and Lesbians Can Deal with Homophobes

IDENTIFYING HIDDEN HOMOPHOBIA

Gays and lesbians cannot eliminate all the homophobia in the world. But they can at least learn to better handle the homophobia the world has to offer them.

First, gays and lesbians need to recognize hidden homophobia. Too often gays and lesbians deliberately or unconsciously overlook homophobia so that they can deny they have real enemies. That temporarily helps them feel less depressed. But to use a medical analogy, it is as if they are denying they are coughing up blood, just hoping it will go away. It spares their day, but it ruins their life. Gays and lesbians can handle homophobia best if they learn when and where it exists. If they know what they are dealing with they will know when they have been discriminated against, and are not just imagining it. So they will not feel paranoid when they are in fact being persecuted. Here are some discriminatory put-downs that some gays and lesbians did not immediately recognize as signaling the presence of hidden homophobia:

A gay man was asking reasonable questions about a straight man's sister. After a few questions the straight man snapped, "You are asking me more questions about my sister than I care to answer." Notable for its absence was, "I am answering fewer questions about my sister than you care to ask."

An individual finds gays unacceptable as equals -- that is, as friends or neighbors. However, she dwells on their virtues when they are in her employ, doing her a service like catering her affairs or installing her window shades.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Homophobia: Description, Development, and Dynamics of Gay Bashing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.