Transracial Adoptees and Their Families: A Study of Identity and Commitment

By Rita J. Simon; Howard Altstein | Go to book overview

supply in the United States but more available in other nations, largely accounts for the ever-increasing numbers of intercountry adoptees. Our guess is that, unless other countries implement policies that reduce (or perhaps even eliminate) available numbers of children for adoption, American families who want to adopt will continue to look to the children of other countries as a solution to short supply here. Since these children represent a different type of transracial adoption (e.g., transcultural), it remains to be seen whether their long-term experiences will be similar to those of native born nonwhites, transracially adopted. As of 1985, data describing intercountry adoptees' overall adjustment match information about transracial adoptees. The large majority appear to be enjoying positive experiences.24

One family characterized their experiences in this manner:

In this claim we are not saying that bicultural adoptive families are qualitatively unique -- all children are vulnerable to insecurity and isolation; all parents are plagued by uncertainty and guilt -- we are just suggesting that the normal problems of family life become magnified in a bicultural adoptive setting. The problems have the same shape, they are just larger. But there remains a very distinct possibility that the joys of parenting are also larger in an adoptive family. To create life where there was none offers its own rewards, but these are exceeded by the joys of creating hope where there was despair.25


NOTES
1.
Maryann Bucknum, "The Baby Business", McCall's, June 1985, p. 88.
2.
Barbara Joe, "In Defense of Intercountry Adoption", Social Service Review 52, no 1 ( March 1978), p. 1, is one of the best articles on the historical perspective of ICA.
3.
Alfred Kadushin, Child Welfare Services ( New York: Macmillan, 1980), p. 506.
4.
Genevieve De Hoyos et al., "Adoption Differentials in Three Cultural Settings". Paper presented at the First International Conference on Pediatric Social Work, Chicago, August 14, 1982.
5.
Warren Hoge, "Brazil Blocks 13 Adoptions by Americans", New York Times, October 11, 1981.
6.
Kadushin, op. cit., p. 506.
7.
Personal ad. Baltimore Sun, June 30, 1985, p. E2.
8.
U.S. Senate, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Courts, March 16, 1984, p. 26.
12.
Rita J. Simon and Howard Altstein, Transracial Adoption: A Follow-up ( Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, 1981), p. 97.
13.
Immigration and Naturalization Service, Statistical Analysis Branch, Statistical Year Books, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984. ( Washington D.C. Goverment Printing Office).

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transracial Adoptees and Their Families: A Study of Identity and Commitment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I 1
  • 1 - Where We Are Today: Numbers, Practices, and Policies 3
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Recent Court Rulings 12
  • Notes 22
  • Part II 25
  • 3 - Looking Back at the Familles 27
  • Notes 32
  • 4 - The Parents' Story 33
  • Notes 56
  • 5 - The Children's Account 57
  • Notes 83
  • 6 - How the Parents' and Children's Accounts Match Up 85
  • Notes 91
  • 7 - Special Families: Problems, Disappointments, Conflicts 92
  • Notes 107
  • 8 - Ordinary Families: A Collective Portrait 108
  • Notes 118
  • Part III 119
  • 9 - Effects of Abortion, Birth Rate, and Lifestyle on Inracial and Transracial Adoptions 121
  • Notes 126
  • 10 - Single Parent Adoption: A Continuing Alternative 127
  • Notes 131
  • 11 - Intercountry Adoption 132
  • Notes 138
  • Concluding Remarks and Recommendations 140
  • Note 143
  • Selected Bibliography 145
  • Index 147
  • About the Authors 151
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 151

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.