Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction

By John B. Edmunds Jr. | Go to book overview

6. An Insolvable Dilemma

T he North, so far as we can judge from all components of public opinion--the Press--resolutions of state legislatures--and the actual vote of representatives in Congress--have determined that slavery should not be introduced into any country that the fortune of war or the terms of a treaty, may obtain for us from Mexico."1 This was the picture painted by Armistead Burt on the eve of the presidential contest. As abolitionist sentiment grew, it was matched by equally strong southern indignation. The unsettling question of slavery absorbed all other issues. In South Carolina songs of defiance were sung:

Yes, Yes, the direful storm is brewing
Soon in its rage to burst amain
And blight each lovely Southern Plain
With desolation and ruin
Arise--Arise ye Brave
Our banners be unfurl'd
We will swear our rights to save
Proclaim it to the World.2

Committees of safety and vigilance were formed, and in every hamlet Southern Rights Associations elected delegates to a statewide convention to be held in Columbia. Each time the Wilmot Proviso was brought up in Congress, it passed in the House but failed in the Senate; on each occasion the number of congressmen voting for the proviso increased. Taylor's election ushered in more Whig representatives, who now controlled the House, 115-110.3

Talk of disunion was omnipresent. Armistead Burt, in a speech given at Abbeville, urged the South to work in concert and hold a convention of slaveholding states to prevent the destruction of their sacred institution. Pickens continually worried that, if South Carolina took a lead in promoting a southern convention, thousands would "fall back under the everlasting charge of South Carolina ultraism and South Carolina disunion."4 However, there was also the fear that, if moves were not made to unite the South, northern assaults would become even more prevalent.

Seabrook's election as governor was a triumph for the growing number of

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1. Young Radical 3
  • 2. a Provocative Course 21
  • 3. a Vile Association 47
  • 4. Harbinger of Doom 71
  • 5. a Litany of Destruction 95
  • 6. an Insolvable Dilemma 112
  • 7. a Mere Office-Seeker 120
  • 8. the Rose of Texas 137
  • 9. a Fire-Eater Down to the Ground 150
  • 10. Governor and Council 167
  • 11- "There Can Lay No Peace for Me" 173
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 223
  • Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.