Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction

By John B. Edmunds Jr. | Go to book overview

11. "There Can Lay No Peace for Me"

Francis Pickens may have rejoiced that he was free from the rancor of politics as he waited for the train to take him back to Edgefield on that cold December day, but Lucy was surely disappointed to leave Columbia with its concerts, dinner parties, political intrigues, and other amusements.1 She had enjoyed being first lady of the sovereign state of South Carolina. Now there would be no more affairs of state with throngs of liveried servants, no more welcoming of wounded heroes, no more flirting with the men in Columbia. Now it was back to Edgefield, "the dim unknown of the interior."2Lucy had been demoted from being the first lady to being the mistress of a large upcountry plantation. When Pickens was younger, the plantation had been a place of joy and easy living. The slaves at Edgewood continued to labor with little supervision; however, the war, a substantial diminution in the acreage planted, and uncertain markets combined to change the mode of life. The slaves continued to be well treated but were fewer than previously. There were financial difficulties as banks continued to discount the Confederate currency. During the summer of 1864 Pickens found life increasingly difficult, with "bread getting as important as powder." In order to show his patriotism, the former governor continued to send more of his slaves to the coast to help build badly needed fortifications.3

The period between the end of Pickens's governorship and the end of the war became one of great demoralization. The gleam of life faded, and dreams of a southern nation were ending in defeat. In May 1863 Arthur Simkins, whose newspaper had been of immeasurable help in promoting Pickens, died of congestive fever, the same malady that had killed his sisters.4 The Advertiser's columns were full of death as the human costs of the war mounted. In the midst of the pages of sadness was a bit of pride for Pickens when the paper announced that his son-in-law, Matthew C. Butler, had been promoted to general by the Confederacy.5 However, as the news became grimmer, Pickens became more fatalistic. A movement to reelect him as governor seemed to do little to bolster his spirits. (The movement failed, since the state constitution mandated a four-year interval between terms.6) Toward the war's end the former governor discovered the fleeting nature of fame: on a trip to Richmond

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1. Young Radical 3
  • 2. a Provocative Course 21
  • 3. a Vile Association 47
  • 4. Harbinger of Doom 71
  • 5. a Litany of Destruction 95
  • 6. an Insolvable Dilemma 112
  • 7. a Mere Office-Seeker 120
  • 8. the Rose of Texas 137
  • 9. a Fire-Eater Down to the Ground 150
  • 10. Governor and Council 167
  • 11- "There Can Lay No Peace for Me" 173
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 223
  • Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.