Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction

By John B. Edmunds Jr. | Go to book overview

Index
Abbeville, 75, 112
Abney, Joseph, 101, 102, 105, 106
Abolitionism: growth of movement, 8, 13, 31, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 56, 60, 67, 74, 81, 89, 95, 107; as a viable political force, 112, 131. See also Slavery
Adams, James H., 53, 146
Adams, John, 7
Adams, John Quincy, 8, 20, 25, 26, 27; on banking issues, 35; scorns Pickens, 35, 38; introduces anti-slavery resolutions, 41; denounces South, 44, 45, 67; presents memorials on Texas and slavery, 44-45; denounces Pickens, 62; introduces reapportionment resolutions, 68-69; condemned by Pickens, 89; fights gag rule, 89
Adriatic (ship), 148
Agriculture, 23, 72, 92, 95; cotton, 7, 8, 11, 21, 31, 32, 48, 66, 75, 92, 179; corn, 23, 75; rice, 23. See also Pickens, Francis Wilkinson: as agriculturist
Aiken, William, 87
Alabama, 7, 11, 21, 22, 28, 47, 72, 95, 123, 128, 139, 145, 150, 160
Alamo, The, 44, 101
Alexander II of Russia, 140, 141
Allen, Thomas, 33
Allston, Robert F. W., 57
Anderson, Alexander, 76
Anderson, Robert, 159, 160; moves Union forces to Fort Sumter, 156; warns Pickens, 158; evacuates Fort Sumter, 163
AndersonTrue Carolinian, 136
Andrews, Sidney, 176
Aristotle, 5
Aroostook War, 60
Athens Southern Banner, 110
Bacon, James, 178
Bacon, John E., 140, 143, 145, 175
Baltimore, 178; Democratic convention of 1844, 74, 76, 78, 79, 80, 98; Democratic convention of 1852, 124, 130; Democratic convention of 1860, 145
BaltimoreMerchant, 32, 35
Bank of Alabama, 22, 28
Bank of the State of South Carolina, 51, 104
Bank of the United States, 7, 8, 33; Jackson vetoes recharter, 25, 28; collapses, 39. See also Banks and banking
Banks and banking, 7, 23, 28, 36, 62, 63, 74. See also Independent treasury
Barnwell, Robert W.: delegate at Nashville convention, 114; appointed United States senator, 115; aversion to public office, 119
Beaufort, 51, 80, 89; Union troops occupy, 168
Beauregard, Pierre G. T., 162, 163
Benton, Thomas Hart, 141
BeVine, Ellen, 50
Biddle, Nicholas, 28, 33
Blair, Francis P., 26, 58, 83, 95; praises Pickens, 33, 38; supports Calhoun, 35, 38; opposes Calhoun, 41
Blair and Rives (Democratic printers), 58
Bluffton movement, 81, 84, 87, 90-92, 96, 98, 99, 102, 105, 115. See also Rhett, Robert Barnwell
Bonham, Milledge L., 101, 126, 127, 134, 140, 143, 145; elected to South Carolina convention, 120; influence on Pickens, 125, 154; succeeds Pickens as governor, 171, 172, 174; receives amnesty, 177

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Francis W. Pickens and the Politics of Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1. Young Radical 3
  • 2. a Provocative Course 21
  • 3. a Vile Association 47
  • 4. Harbinger of Doom 71
  • 5. a Litany of Destruction 95
  • 6. an Insolvable Dilemma 112
  • 7. a Mere Office-Seeker 120
  • 8. the Rose of Texas 137
  • 9. a Fire-Eater Down to the Ground 150
  • 10. Governor and Council 167
  • 11- "There Can Lay No Peace for Me" 173
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 223
  • Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.