Sendero Luminoso and the Threat of Narcoterrorism

By Gabriela Tarazona-Sevillano; John B. Reuter | Go to book overview

3
Strategy: Achieving the New Democratic Republic

The Popular War
Sendero Luminoso plans to bring Peru into the New Democratic Republic through a political and military struggle known as the "popular war." Its primary offensive weapon is the popular guerrilla army, whose members are drawn from the rural and urban underclasses. Strategy and direction are provided by the Sendero hierarchy; the central committee drafts general objectives and allows regional committees to define them more specifically. The popular war, as conceived by Guzmán, is composed of five phases, each bringing the party and the nation one step closer to the new state:
1. Agitation and propaganda . The purpose of this stage is to raise class consciousness and agitate the population, exacerbating existing class conflicts and calling attention to income inequalities and the "corrupt" system.
2. Sabotage and guerrilla action . This stage involves increased military action, directed for the most part against property belonging to the state and large companies. Sendero hopes this action will further weaken an already trembling economy, leading more people to become frustrated with the difficult living conditions and turn to the insurgency as an answer.

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Sendero Luminoso and the Threat of Narcoterrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • About the Author xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Summary xv
  • 1 - Historical Background 1
  • 2 - Ideology and Goals 10
  • 3 - Strategy: Achieving the New Democratic Republic 29
  • 4 - Organization 55
  • 5 - Government Response 79
  • 6 - Narcoterrorism 99
  • 7 - Conclusion 133
  • Notes 140
  • Index 163
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