Black Legacy: America's Hidden Heritage

By William D. Piersen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
"Das Duh Way Dey Ketch Um"

If Africans explained the imbalances of the international slave trade with theories of white cannibalism and myths about God's gifts to the races, African Americans developed their own legends to explain to their children and grandchildren how it was that Africans came to be enslaved. Historians usually tend to see the African victims of enslavement as pawns in a larger game of greed between white slavers and African coastal elites. But a series of folk narratives that came into existence in the southeastern United States and the nearby Caribbean suggest that earlier generations of African Americans understood their forefathers' misfortune differently. One series of legends blamed the ancestors for character flaws that made them vulnerable to enslavement, and another group of tales made it clear that slavery was the product of a most immoral form of man-stealing.


The Color Red Brought Us Here

As the passing of time transformed individual recollections of enslavement into a less personal but more communal property, a number of legends grew up that blamed black vulnerability to enslavement on the African's foolish love of exotic adornment symbolized by the color red. One of the most interesting versions of this color-red legend was recalled by a Cuban ex-slave named Esteban Montejo:

It all started with the scarlet handkerchiefs, the day they crossed the wall. There was an old wall in Africa, right around the coast, made of palm-bark and magic insects which stung like the devil. For years they frightened away all the whites who tried to set foot in Africa. It was the

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Legacy: America's Hidden Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.