OVID'S METAMORPHOSES IN EUROPEAN CULTURE

Volume One, Treating Books 1-5

BY WILMON BRFWER

The companion volume to Ovid's Metamorphoses in blank verse by Brookes More

The Cornhill Publishing Company, Boston, Mass.


REVIEWS AND OPINIONS

The first survey to make a comprehensive study of the Metamorphoses in relation to the entire history of western culture. Evidences of its influence are to be found in tapestry, painting, sculpture, and opera, as well as in the work of a host of major and minor poets. -- The Evansville Courier-Journal.

Mr. Brewer's critique will prove an eye-opener to the average reader of today. The influence of Ovid on European culture is definitely shown by illustration. Here is an excellent opportunity for moderns to find profitable enjoyment by turning back the pages of literature. -- The Knickerbocker.

Mr. Brewer has supplied material of much historical and critical interest. The volume begins by telling the story of Ovid's life. It relates his work to that of his Greek and Roman predecessors, then recounts the influence of Ovid on writers who followed. Complete data is given for each book and each story in the book: the origin of the tale, Ovid's treatment of it, subsequent use of the tale by classic, medieval, and modern poets and prose writers of Europe. This comprehensive survey, which has its own clarity of style and contains much new material, is a fine piece of scholarly work in itself, as well as a

-242-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sonnets and Sestinas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • SONNETS 1
  • Single Sonnets 3
  • Sonnets from the Chinese 19
  • Sonnets for Christmas Time 27
  • SESTINAS 39
  • Single Sestinas 41
  • Double Sestinas 77
  • HISTORY OF THE SONNET 91
  • History of the Sonnet 93
  • HISTORY OF THE SESTINA 179
  • History of the Sestina 181
  • INDEX OF AUTHORS 215
  • INDEX OF POETICAL FORMS 229
  • INDEX OF POETICAL FORMS: THE SESTINA 235
  • SHAKESPEARE'S INFLUENCE ON SIR WALTER SCOTT 237
  • DANTE'S ECLOGUES - The Poetical Correspondence between Dante and Giovanni Del Virgilio 239
  • OVID'S METAMORPHOSES IN EUROPEAN CULTURE 242
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.