The Causes of Economic Fluctuations: Possibilities of Anticipation and Control

By Willford I. King | Go to book overview

is clearly shown by Wladimir Woytinski in his book, The Social Consequences of the Economic Depression, published in 1936 for the International Labor Office of the League of Nations.

Depressions Not Inescapable . -- Available evidence seems to indicate, however, that what has just been said does not apply to one great nation. The indications are that, outside of conditions due to foreign trade, Russia was affected but little by the influences which wrought such havoc upon the residents of the Western World. It appears, then, that modern depressions must be regarded as phenomena growing out of the capitalistic and competitive organization of society. In other words, there appears to be something in the mechanism of our social arrangements which gives rise to, or at least assists in making possible these untoward conditions. The indications are, therefore, that these untoward conditions cannot, correctly, be ascribed merely to the vicissitudes of our natural environment.


REFERENCES

or descriptions of the typical course followed by a depression, see:

Ayres Leonard P. The Chief Cause of This and other Depressions. The Cleveland Trust Co., Cleveland, 1935.

Cassel Gustav. The Theory of Social Economy. Translated by Joseph Harcourt McCabe , Brace & Co., New York, 1924, Fourth Book.

Durbin E. F. M. Purchasing Power and Trade Depression. Jonathan Cape, London, 1933, Ch. V.

Fisher Irving. Booms and Depressions. Adelphi Co., New York, 1932, pp. 3-43.

Haberler Gottfried von. Prosperity and Depression. League of Nations, Geneva, 1937, Chs. 9, 10.

Haney Lewis H. Business Forecasting. Ginn & Co., Boston, 1931, Ch. 7. See as well the chapter on business cycles by Dr. Haney in Spahr, Walter E. (Editor), Economic Principles and Problems, Farrar & Rinehart, New York, Third Edition, Ch. XXVIII.

Hansen Alvin H. Cycles of Prosperity and Depression in the United States, Great Britain and Germany. University of Wisconsin, Studies in the Social Sciences and History, No. 5, Madison, 1921, pp. 104-110.

Hayek F. A. Monetary Theory and the Trade Cycle. Translated from the German by M. Kaldor and H. M. Croome; Jonathan Cape, London, 1933, Ch.IV.

Jordan D. F. Practical Business Forecasting. Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1927, Chs. XIV-XV.

-47-

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The Causes of Economic Fluctuations: Possibilities of Anticipation and Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Charts xiii
  • Chapter 1 - INTRODUCTION 3
  • References 18
  • Chapter 2 - CHARACTERISTICS OF BUSINESS DEPRESSIONS 20
  • References 47
  • Chapter 3 - RECORD OF BUSINESS DEPRESSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 49
  • References 72
  • Chapter 4 - MISLEADING EXPLANATIONS OF THE ORIGINS OF DEPRESSIONS 74
  • References 107
  • Chapter 5 - INADEQUATE EXPLANATIONS OF THE ORIGINS OF DEPRESSIONS 109
  • References 124
  • Chapter 6 - THE DEPRESSION CULTURE-MEDIUM 125
  • REFFRENCES 134
  • Chapter 7 - THE DEPRESSION'S ORIGIN 138
  • References 168
  • Chapter 8 - FORCES TENDING TO ACCENTUATE AND PROLONG DEPRESSIONSS 169
  • References 194
  • Chapter 9 - INEFFECTIVE WAYS OF COMBATING DEPRESSION 196
  • References 207
  • Chapter 10 - FORCES COMMONLY TENDING TO END DEPRESSION 209
  • References 222
  • Chapter 11 - CYCLES 223
  • References 244
  • Chapter 12 - THE POSSIBILITY OF FORECASTING BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS 247
  • References 263
  • Chapter 13 - SOCIAL COST OF UNSTABLE PRODUCTION 266
  • References 279
  • Chapter 14 - WAYS TO MINIMIZE DEPRESSION 282
  • References 311
  • Chapter 15 - WAYS TO MINIMIZE DEPRESSION (CONTINUED) 313
  • References 337
  • Index 339
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