Henry Barnard: An Introduction

By Ralph C. Jenkins; Gertrude Chandler Warner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
TO THE WEST AND BACK AGAIN

FOR a long time now, Henry Barnard had been dipping into his private funds. His salary had never been adequate, and such as it was, he had acquired the chronic habit of putting it back into the "work" just as soon as he received it.

His periods of illness and rest had to be paid for, and there had never been a time when publication of his writings had been wholly financed by anybody else. The Connecticut Common School Journal had never paid for itself, and lucky he was to have any money of his own, now that his family was larger, and he was entertaining more ambitious plans for his literary pursuits.

In his own mind, this state publication had always been only a "dress rehearsal" for a more elaborate undertaking of similar character. He planned now, and said as much, to publish ten volumes of a national magazine, which should contain all the educational history of every state and every nation, biographies of educators, minute descriptions of model school-houses with architect's plans, teaching methods and model curricula.

To this task he now set his hand. (It is to be supposed that this was his idea of resting.) Much of his information was in his own head, and much

-63-

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Henry Barnard: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • TABLES AT A GLANCE *
  • Foreword *
  • Chapter One - HENRY BARNARD: DO YOU KNOW HIM? 1
  • Chapter Two - YELLOW LIGHT; PREPARING TO GO. 11
  • Chapter Three - GREEN LIGHT: GO 24
  • Chapter Four - TO RHODE ISLAND 35
  • Chapter Five - BACK TO CONNECTICUT 49
  • Chapter Six - TO THE WEST AND BACK AGAIN 63
  • Chapter Seven - A DEBT OVERPAID 71
  • Chapter Eight - THEY KNEW DR. BARNARD 78
  • Chapter Nine - DR. BARNARD AT HOME 86
  • Chapter Ten - HENRY BARNARD, HIS MARK 97
  • QUOTATIONS FROM HENRY BARNARD 107
  • POSITIONS AT A GLANCE 112
  • TRIBUTES TO HENRY BARNARD 114
  • Bibliography 118
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