A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden

By Walter Shaw Sparrow | Go to book overview

PREFACE TO PART II

I

BRITISH etching began to interest me forty-six years ago, at the Slade School of Art. A new-comer not yet seventeen, I noticed new things and listened to a new jargon as though a wishing-cap had plopped me down suddenly in a foreign land. Some fellows who talked about "grounds" and "stopping out," and whose fingers were blotched with a yellow stain, were favoured too much, getting private talks with Legros easier than anyone else. They were etchers, these immortals, and William Strang was among them, like J. B. Clark. His first published plate, brought out by The Etcher in 1881, was signed W. Strang, F.S.P.E. It represented a woodman; but that string of letters after his name and its pride of craft enabled me to take only a mild pleasure in forestry. Fellow of the Society of Painter- Etchers! And Strang was only three years my senior.

Another Sladeite romped into publicity before Strang. It wasn't J. B. Clark, but G. P. Jacomb-Hood. He had a plate in The Portfolio as early as 1880, showing how "A Gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine." One day I was told by a writer on art, my uncle, G. T. Robinson, that Legros did not originate the fervour for etching, as many youngsters believed; that the Etching Club had fostered keenness through many years, producing at last a genuine movement. For this reason I should go through the Club's publications, and connect them with earlier etchings. Thus a beginning was made, and to begin any good hobby study is a very enjoyable test of character, for its end cannot be reached in the brief seasons of a perishable life. So there's no need to treat it very methodically. Ramble over it, picking and choosing what you like best.

But one thing certainly should end--the neglect of British etchers, even by men who publish books on etching. To drop connecting links

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.