A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden

By Walter Shaw Sparrow | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
FROM PAUL SANDBY TO EDWIN LANDSEER, THROUGH GAINSBOROUGH AND ROWLANDSON

I

PAUL SANDBY lived to be eighty-four, dying in 1809. Very frequently his landscapes are united to aspects of country life, which were known in his time as "English Pastoral." Gainsborough, too, in soft-ground etchings, with or without aquatint, while thinking of landscape design, touches country life variously. One mood of design is represented by "The Gipsy Encampment," for example, an aquatint mixed with etching, sometimes a little tinted with crayon and wash. It is a pretty day-dream of country life among trees, with gentle and sweet lyrical qualities, Mrs. Gainsborough and her children playing cosily "at gipsies," accompanied by a donkey.

Note in their peculiar charm Gainsborough's own amalgam of masculine and feminine gifts, with a bias towards feminine grace and tenderness. True genius has always been androgynous, a single creative agent with a double sex. To note with impartial care how the male and female attributes are balanced in the work done by persons of genius, is to enrich the study of all art with a great many new enjoyments. A woman of genius may be too feminine or too masculine in her appeals as an artist, and a man of genius may be too masculine or too feminine. It is not often that the male and female attributes are perfectly balanced, with a moderate bias towards manliness in men's work, towards womanliness in the art of very gifted women.

They are balanced very well in Gainsborough's free and broad aquatints and soft-ground etchings. There is one of cattle driven through sunny and wooded pasture, a rapid improvisation charmed with naturalism

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.