Two Plays of Menander: The Rape of the Locks, the Arbitration

By Menander; Gilbert Murray | Go to book overview

ACT II

ONÊSIMUS alone.

ONÊSIMUS

A slippery business, all the life of man!
Take me, now. All my duties summed together,
My fatherland, my refuge and my law,
My judge of every right and every wrong,
Is just my master. And, God only knows
How slippery he is! Still, we stand together,
We two. We're partners now in my discovery.
As soon as he got back from Ephesus,
I went straight up, took him aside, and told him,
So naturally he's grateful--Naturally,
He must be grateful . . . This old man, of course,
Annoys us and will soon annoy us more.
No doubt his daughter's told him half the story,
Young Habro and the cook and the rare wines,
And what they all cost, and lots more as well.
I don't suppose she said one word about
Her own affair, which started all the trouble.
All right, it's up to me. If the old man
Knew everything, of course he'd take our side,
But can we tell him? Obviously we can't,
A husband can't proclaim his own dishonour.
Impossible! . . . Well, since I'm not allowed
To let the man know what he doesn't know,
I've got to make him un-know what he knows.
That's a bit puzzling.

-148-

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Two Plays of Menander: The Rape of the Locks, the Arbitration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • The Rape of the Locks the Perikeiromenê of Menander 3
  • Preface 5
  • ACT I AND PROLOGUE 13
  • PROLOGUE 21
  • ACT II 31
  • ACT III 49
  • ACT IV 71
  • ACT V 89
  • Notes 109
  • The Arbitration the Epitrepontes of Menander 117
  • Introduction 119
  • ACT I 127
  • ACT II 148
  • ACT III 168
  • ACT IV 189
  • ACT V 207
  • Notes 231
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