Chapter 6
Turki ibn Sa'ud

T HE collapse of the Wahhabi leadership, based as it was on religious and moral sanctions which had won the respect of the people, if not always their unreserved devotion, had resulted naturally enough, though with somewhat surprising rapidity, in the relaxation of the disciplines which had rescued the Arabs from the virtual barbarism of pre- Wahhabi times. The old tribal and parochial jealousies and rivalries resumed their sway over the country with the open or covert connivance of its new masters, who were in no wise interested in promoting the welfare of the people or the reconstruction of an economy which had been shattered by the war. On the contrary, Ibrahim's immediate and deliberate object was to strike terror into the hearts of the people, and to impose upon them the utmost exactions required for the maintenance of his troops in their scattered garrison posts, while destroying all possible local means of resistance to their tyranny. The voice of reason, let alone religion, was heard no more in the land. Travel between village and village was too dangerous to be attempted, while even in the towns respectable citizens could not move without escorts. Backbiting and false accusations became the order of the day; and the Egyptians, dealing one by one with their helpless and incoherent victims, had no difficulty in appropriating their belongings and the produce of their harvests for the benefit of the army, while they destroyed all walls and buildings likely to shelter resistance to their merciless exactions and cruelties.

What with these heavy demands on local resources, and the destruction of palm-groves and growing crops during and after the war, famine conditions inevitably supervened. It is difficult to believe the story that the Egyptian troops were at times reduced to eating grass; but it is more than probable that their unfortunate victims had such experiences. And there does not seem to be on record any single administrative act designed to improve the lot of the people, or increase the productivity of

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Saudi Arabia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Barony of Dar'iya 8
  • Chapter 2 - Muhammad ibn Sa'ud 33
  • Chapter 3 - 'Abdul-'Aziz I ibn Sa'ud 60
  • Chapter 4 - Sa'ud II ibn Sa'ud 101
  • Chapter 5 - 'Abdullah I ibn Sa'ud 128
  • Chapter 6 - Turki ibn Sa'ud 147
  • Chapter 7 - Faisal ibn Sa'ud 169
  • Chapter 8 - 'Abdullah II and Sa'ud III abna Sa'ud 218
  • Chapter 9 - 'Abdul-'Aziz II ibn Sa'ud 237
  • Chapter 10 - Expansion and Consolidation 265
  • Chapter 11 - Arabia Felix 292
  • Index 361
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 396

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.