VI WEST OF THE SIERRA MADRE

MEXICO'S northwest, isolated beyond the Sierra Madre, has been the least-known part of Mexico, even to Mexicans. I had motored over worn wagon tracks in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa long before there was a motor road, and had traveled by train when the Southern Pacific of Mexico ran three times a week. I now decided to see that region again, approaching it from Guadalajara as sixteenth- century Spaniards had done. The new paved highway will bring Mexico and the United States closer together in the the west, as the highway north from Guadalajara enters the United States at Nogales, Arizona. It will connect many sources of wealth with the rest of the Republic, lure unassimilated tribes out of the mountains, and bring on a new tourist invasion. This is the pattern of all Mexico's northern states, which have been more closely linked with their nearest neighbors in the United States than with Mexico to the south. Tamaulipas, on the Gulf of Mexico, is bounded by the Río Bravo, which we know as the Rio Grande. Nuevo León, whose Nuevo Laredo faces its twin town of Laredo, Texas, across that river; Coahuila; and Chihuahua all meet Texas on the Río Bravo. West of Ciudad Juárez, the line between Chihuahua and New Mexico and Arizona, between Sonora and Arizona, is only a surveyor's trace as far as the Colorado River, which crosses Mexican territory to enter the Gulf of California. The long peninsula of Baja California lies beyond. Its northern half

-55-

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Mexico Revisited
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Part One- South toward the Center 1
  • II- Chihuahua 17
  • III- Tarahumara and the Barrancas de Cobre 26
  • IV- Durango and Zacatecas 33
  • Part Two- Mexico''s North 45
  • V- Crossing the Sierra Occidental 47
  • VI- West of the Sierra Madre 55
  • VII- La Laguna and the Ejido System 63
  • VIII- A Gringo Mexican 74
  • IX- Francisco Madero 83
  • X- Monterrey 88
  • Part Three- Indian Backgrounds 99
  • XII- Yucatán 111
  • XIII- Mexico''s Maya Ruins 121
  • XIV- The Valley of Oaxaca 130
  • XV- Chiapas and the Indian Problem 139
  • Part Four- Conquest from the Gulf 149
  • XVI- Spanish Conquest 151
  • XVII- Conquest from the North 158
  • XVIII- Reconquest for Mexico 162
  • Part Five- Mexico''s Heartland 167
  • XIX- San Luis Potosĺ 169
  • XX- querétaro 180
  • XXI- San Miguel Allende 191
  • XXII- Guanajuato 199
  • XXIV- Uruapan 218
  • XXV- Pátzcuaro and Morelia 227
  • Part Seven- South to the Pacific 235
  • XXVI- Cuernavaca 237
  • XXVII- Taxco 245
  • XXVIII- Acapulco 254
  • Part Eight- East to the Gulf 261
  • XXX- Huejotzingo and Tlaxcala 277
  • XXXI- Puebla de Los Angeles 284
  • Part Nine- Capital and Center 293
  • XXXII- Mexico, the Capital 295
  • XXXIII- Folk Art Becomes Big Business 305
  • XXXIV- People of the Capital 314
  • XXXV- Mexico Moves on 324
  • BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR FURTHER READING IN ENGLISH 337
  • BOOKS CONSULTED IN SPANISH 340
  • Glossary 342
  • Index i
  • A Note on the Type v
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