XX QUERÉTARO

QUERÉTARO is so chockful of history that its present is easily overlooked. It was the scene of the beginnings of the Wars of Independence in 1810, of Maximilian's tragic end in 1866, and of the Constitution of 1917. Its plazas and palaces seem alive with important ghosts in period costumes. But Querétaro is important now as the dominant city of El Bajío (Lowlands), which includes the states of Querétaro, Aguascalientes, and Guanajuato, one of the nation's richest areas. Its mountains have produced mineral wealth, its flatlands are covered with grain fields and orchards, and its small cities, once notable for healing springs, miraculous shrines, and the maddest churrigueresque architecture, are growing into industrial towns laced together by heavy trucks on paved highways.

Much of the old remains. San Juan de los Lagos attracts the largest crowds for its religious fiesta in February. Aguascalientes features its hot springs along with its textile factories. And churrigueresque churches flower out with plump angels and cherubs among luscious fruits and riotous foliage. The Bajío also saw architecture's cooling-off when Francisco Eduardo Tresguerras, influenced by Italian neo- classicism, lightened Mexico's churches with clear space and unadorned pillars. The church of El Carmen in his birthplace of Celaya is considered his masterpiece; he also built there a perfect little chapel for his own burial place.

Tresguerras, a sort of Mexican Leonardo da Vinci, was engineer, sculptor, and painter as well as architect. The

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Mexico Revisited
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Part One- South toward the Center 1
  • II- Chihuahua 17
  • III- Tarahumara and the Barrancas de Cobre 26
  • IV- Durango and Zacatecas 33
  • Part Two- Mexico''s North 45
  • V- Crossing the Sierra Occidental 47
  • VI- West of the Sierra Madre 55
  • VII- La Laguna and the Ejido System 63
  • VIII- A Gringo Mexican 74
  • IX- Francisco Madero 83
  • X- Monterrey 88
  • Part Three- Indian Backgrounds 99
  • XII- Yucatán 111
  • XIII- Mexico''s Maya Ruins 121
  • XIV- The Valley of Oaxaca 130
  • XV- Chiapas and the Indian Problem 139
  • Part Four- Conquest from the Gulf 149
  • XVI- Spanish Conquest 151
  • XVII- Conquest from the North 158
  • XVIII- Reconquest for Mexico 162
  • Part Five- Mexico''s Heartland 167
  • XIX- San Luis Potosĺ 169
  • XX- querétaro 180
  • XXI- San Miguel Allende 191
  • XXII- Guanajuato 199
  • XXIV- Uruapan 218
  • XXV- Pátzcuaro and Morelia 227
  • Part Seven- South to the Pacific 235
  • XXVI- Cuernavaca 237
  • XXVII- Taxco 245
  • XXVIII- Acapulco 254
  • Part Eight- East to the Gulf 261
  • XXX- Huejotzingo and Tlaxcala 277
  • XXXI- Puebla de Los Angeles 284
  • Part Nine- Capital and Center 293
  • XXXII- Mexico, the Capital 295
  • XXXIII- Folk Art Becomes Big Business 305
  • XXXIV- People of the Capital 314
  • XXXV- Mexico Moves on 324
  • BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR FURTHER READING IN ENGLISH 337
  • BOOKS CONSULTED IN SPANISH 340
  • Glossary 342
  • Index i
  • A Note on the Type v
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