Twentieth-Century Czechoslovakia: The Meanings of Its History

By Josef Korbel | Go to book overview

The conceptual treatment of Twentieth-Century Czechoslovakia is historical only to the extent to which the nation's history is related to the principal theme of the study (hence, such topics as the Carpathian Ukraine, for example, or the country's foreign policy, are not treated here in separate chapters; similarly, since I have synthesized much material in the text, and to preserve an uninterrupted narrative, footnotes are reduced to a minimum). Needless to say, one does not approach the effort to follow and analyze the theme without trepidation and humility, nor without full awareness of its controversial nature. To borrow from Ernest Denis, however, I attempted to respond and write "neither without love nor without anger," for, as Karl Marx put it, "Truth is not without passion and passion is not without truth."


Acknowledgments

I am grateful to several institutions and individuals for their assistance in the preparation of this manuscript.

The U.S. Office of Education, Department of Health, Education and Welfare (under the authority of Title VI, Section 602, NDEA) and the American Council of Learned Societies extended to me a generous financial assistance. Robert C. Good, former dean of the Graduate School of International Studies and now president of Denison University, facilitated the work by a favorable arrangement of my teaching assignments. Dr. Paul Horecky, Anita Navon, and Eva Polach of the library of Congress, and Richard F. Staar, Milorad M. Drachkovitch, Wayne S. Vucinich, Ronald Bulatoff, and the librarians at the Hoover Institution gave me most valuable help.

My former students, John West, Enrico David, and Louis Ortmayer, as well as Vera Henzl, contributed as research assistants, and Shirley Taylor, while typing the first draft, improved my English and style.

The manuscript was read in full by Madeleine Albright, Julius Firt, and Jiri Valenta, and in part by Irene Bolen, Radomir Luza, and George Barany.

My warmest thanks go to my editor for this manuscript (and

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth-Century Czechoslovakia: The Meanings of Its History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.