Twentieth-Century Czechoslovakia: The Meanings of Its History

By Josef Korbel | Go to book overview

Index
Action Program, 287-91, 302
Agrarian Party, 57; in 1920 elections, 58; and Munich, 132; suppression of, 219
Agriculture: after World War I, 46; reforms in, 54-56; and world depression, 56; development in interwar period, 79; post World War IIdevelopment 239; post-1948 development 261, 262
Alexandrovskii, Sergei, 137, 138
Arts, 66-67; in Slovakia in interwar period, 105
Austro-Hungarian Empire, 29, 34; and prospect for separate peace, 31, 32; and Wilson's Fourteen Points, 33; Czech politicians' attitude toward, 34-35; and Šmeral's program, 72
Bacílek, Karol, 190, 255
Battle on the White Mountain, 91, 113; consequences of, 9
Bechyně, Rudolf, 185
Beck, General Ludwig, 146
Beneš, Edvard, 122, 158, 252, 310; activities in World War I, 27-28; Štefánik's relationship with, 28-29; and World War I recognition of Czechoslovak government 33; attitude toward revolutionary prospects in Czechoslovakia, 37; and separation of state and church, 48-49; attacks by fascists of, 75, 76; elected in 1935 as president, 78; and Slovakia during World War I, 93; and Czechoslovakism, 98, 99, 100; willingness to territorial Munich concessions, 123; and League of Nations, 123; position on Munich, 128-30, 135, 140-42; under September 1938 pressure from Great Britain and France, 124, 132-33; political philosophy of, 129, 178-79; on prospects of war, 135-36; and opposition to Munich capitulation, 137; and inquiry in Moscow on Munich, 137-38; generals' Munich-time audience

-337-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth-Century Czechoslovakia: The Meanings of Its History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.