A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945

By Martin Kitchen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
From the Outbreak of the War to the Fall of France (September 1939-July 1940)

The German High Command's (OKH) operational orders for the attack on Poland, codenamed 'Plan White', were finalized on 15 June 1939. Although Hitler was confident that Britain and France posed no serious threat, mistakenly believing that their attitude had not changed since Munich and that they would continue to prevaricate and appease, the Wehrmacht was less optimistic. For this reason the plan called for a swift campaign so that troops could be withdrawn to make up for the deficiencies of the 'West Wall', a defensive system which had not yet been completed and which was only lightly manned. A rapid campaign would also make it possible to crush the Polish army before it had time to complete its mobilization and before it could be fully deployed to the west of the Vistula and the Narew.

The plan called for a two-pronged attack centred on Warsaw: Army Group North swooping down from Pomerania and East Prussia, and Army Group South advancing from Silesia and Galicia. Only a handful of troops were ordered to take Danzig. The major problem for the planners was that Army Group North had both to secure the Polish Corridor and to advance towards Warsaw. Forces had also to be ready to encircle Polish units able to escape this massive pincer movement by moving to the east of the capital. For this purpose, tanks were ideal.

To give the political leadership maximum freedom of action, mobilization had to be swift and secret and thus could not include industry and the civilian population. Hitler ordered a 'mobilization without a public announcement' to take effect on 28 August, by which time the army had been increased by three million men. A series of manoeuvres and exercises was carried out from the end of

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.