A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945

By Martin Kitchen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Italy and the Balkans (July 1943-October 1944)

On 10 July 1943 Montgomery's 8th Army and Patton's 7th Army landed on the south coast of Sicily. The Allies caught the Germans by surprise. In an operation involving 'the man who never was', phoney plans for the invasion of Sardinia and Greece were planted on a corpse which was washed ashore and fell into German hands. Hitler was taken in by this deception, although Kesselring, who commanded the troops in Italy, felt that the plans were a hoax and believed that the Allies would land in Sicily. 'Operation Husky' was badly planned and poorly executed. Although the landings were marginally more efficiently conducted than for 'Torch', 47 of the 134 British gliders landed in the sea and a counter-attack by the Hermann Goering Division drove the invaders back to the beaches. The situation was saved only when naval guns were levelled against the Panzers. Faced with such unequal firepower, the Germans were obliged to withdraw.

The Germans had inadequate forces for the defence of Sicily and 'Ultra' informed the Allies of their movements and intentions. Complete air and naval supremacy, plus the enthusiasm of the Italian troops for surrender rather than for fighting, guaranteed the success of the operation. The crucial mistake made by the Allies was not to block off the German retreat across the straits to the mainland where they could regroup. Patton's army dashed across the island then headed eastward, reaching Messina on 17 August. Montgomery took a painfully long time to cover a shorter route along the cast coast. General Hube had time to build a defensive front which was punctured only when fresh troops were brought in from Tunis.

The Germans retreated across the straits in a brilliantly conducted operation which resulted in minimal casualties. Had the Allies

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.